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    INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

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    Hole

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  Hole on Sat Oct 27, 2018 4:36 pm

    Good summary. respekt
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    GunshipDemocracy

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:04 am

    Hole wrote:Good summary. respekt



    agreed a good post thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
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    George1

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 12, 2018 11:15 am

    “Russia could shift to preemptive nuclear strike doctrine — ex-chief of RVSN”

    “Retaliatory nuclear strike command and control system ‘Perimeter’ has been modernized”

    “Moscow. 9 November. INTERFAKS-AVN – Russia could renounce its retaliatory strike doctrine in favor of a preemptive nuclear attack on a potential aggressor, if the U.S. deploys missiles on the territory of European states, said General-Colonel Viktor Yesin, who led the Main Staff of the Missile Troops of Strategic Designation in 1994-1996.”

    “‘If the Americans start deploying their missiles in Europe, we have no choice but to abandon a retaliatory strike doctrine and move to a preemptive strike doctrine,’ V. Yesin said in an interview published in the weekly ‘Zvezda.'”

    “He also said the Soviet-created ‘command’ missile system ‘Perimeter’ capable of transmitting launch commands to intercontinental missiles after an enemy nuclear strike on Russia has been modernized.”

    “‘The ‘Perimeter’ system is functioning, and it is even improved,’ said V. Yesin.”

    “Answering the question if the ‘Perimeter’ system can guarantee a retaliatory strike in the case of an enemy preemptive attack, the general said: ‘When it is working, we will already have few means remaining – we can launch only the missiles which survive after the aggressor’s first strike.'”

    “The expert also stated that ‘we still don’t have an effective response to American medium-range missiles in Europe.'”

    “‘Perimeter’ (in English Dead Hand) is an automated command and control system for a massive nuclear retaliatory strike developed in the USSR. According to open information, the ‘Perimeter’ system was created as a component part of the Airborne Command Post (VKP) system under the codename ‘Link’ developed in the Soviet Union.”

    “The airborne command and control post on the Il-86VKP aircraft, airborne radio relay on the Il-76RT, silo-based command missile (KR) ‘Perimeter’ and mobile KR ‘Gorn’¹ were part of ‘Link.'”

    “In a crisis period three Il-86VKP would have had the Supreme Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, Minister of Defense and Chief of the General Staff on board.”

    “‘The aircraft didn’t have passenger windows so those on-board wouldn’t be blinded by the flash of nuclear blasts. Computers and communications were located in the nose. Two electrical power generators were hung under the wings. They guaranteed long operation of all aircraft systems,’ it says in a book from the series ‘World of Russian Weapons’ published in 2016.”

    “At the determined moment the Il-86VKP would launch an 8 km long antenna which not even impulses from nuclear explosions could affect. Using this antenna the aircraft would transmit commands to launch all the country’s intercontinental missiles even in the event that all underground KP [trans. command posts] were destroyed by the aggressor’s nuclear strike.”

    “The radio relay aircraft Il-76RT would transmit commands to launch missiles in distant regions, including those deployed on submarines in the Northern and Pacific Fleets.”

    “‘Perimeter’ and ‘Gorn’ missiles could have transmitted missile launch commands when the aggressor had already delivered a surprise first strike and destroyed communications systems. The KR, having launched into space, where no satellite or enemy nuclear explosions could reach them, would transmit radio signals from there. The missiles ‘awakened’ by them would take off and strike the aggressor.

    “The ‘Perimeter’ missiles were reliably protected on the ground by concrete silos. ‘Gorns’ deployed on missile transporters permanently on the move.”

    “According to expert assessments, the ‘Link’ system, including space KR, was one of the most important factors deterring the U.S. from a nuclear attack on the USSR.”

    An interesting piece bringing Perimeter back into the news. Yesin calls the system Dead Hand. But he doesn’t describe how the system is engaged, any atmospheric, seismic, and radiation sensors, or ground-based command, control, and communications link monitors that some claim allowed it to function autonomously. Others assert these elements, though considered, were never incorporated into Perimeter.

    Russian military commentator Viktor Murakhovskiy has pointed out that, even if the U.S. quits the INF Treaty, Washington is a long way from deploying new intermediate- or shorter-range nuclear missiles in Europe. So Yesin’s recommendation for a change in Moscow’s declaratory nuclear doctrine is premature.

    ¹ Command missile Gorn [trans. bugle, trumpet, etc.] had GRAU index 15Zh53 and deployed with Soviet SS-20 IRBMs.


    https://russiandefpolicy.blog/2018/11/12/dead-hand-alive-and-modernized/
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    miketheterrible

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  miketheterrible on Mon Nov 12, 2018 2:28 pm

    More long range BM patrolling around in Siberia/Ural regions would fill the gap.

    More Topol-M's and Yars. Have them drive around constantly.

    Those in effect would do wonders.

    Actually, isn't most Western Russian missiles silo based and rest are all in east anyway?
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    Hole

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  Hole on Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:11 pm

    He claims Russia has no responds to Amilands medium range missiles in Europe. Really? There is no difference between a Burke-class ship sailing in the Black Sea or North Sea or land-based cruise missiles in Romania or Poland. The russian air defence network is capable of Shooting them down, it doesn´t matter if they are launched from land, sea or air.
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    miketheterrible

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  miketheterrible on Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:17 pm

    Hole wrote:He claims Russia has no responds to Amilands medium range missiles in Europe. Really? There is no difference between a Burke-class ship sailing in the Black Sea or North Sea or land-based cruise missiles in Romania or Poland. The russian air defence network is capable of Shooting them down, it doesn´t matter if they are launched from land, sea or air.

    He is old. He is relying on old information. Maybe he over estimates Tomahawks capabilities. But that is all they are. Tomahawks. Shitty cruise missiles with shoddy accuracy and quality.

    ATACMS maybe he is referring to? They are simply ballistic missiles. Something S-300V series were designed to protect against.
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    GunshipDemocracy

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:20 pm

    I would not really listen to his technical part of is explanation. Interesting are two things

    a) what he didnt say - form Europe IRBM flies 12-15 minutes, from US 25-30 form USSN 15-20? So what is the difference? there are OTH radars that immediately fix missile starting in EU.

    It this 10 minutes make a change then USSR would be already dead by military means not by treachery of elites . They dotn otherwise US would place IRBMs in EU.

    b) talking about preemptive strike... if thsi testing waters before doctrine changes? (IMHO unlikely)
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    magnumcromagnon

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:50 am

    miketheterrible wrote:
    Hole wrote:He claims Russia has no responds to Amilands medium range missiles in Europe. Really? There is no difference between a Burke-class ship sailing in the Black Sea or North Sea or land-based cruise missiles in Romania or Poland. The russian air defence network is capable of Shooting them down, it doesn´t matter if they are launched from land, sea or air.

    He is old.  He is relying on old information.  Maybe he over estimates Tomahawks capabilities. But that is all they are.  Tomahawks.  Shitty cruise missiles with shoddy accuracy and quality.

    ATACMS maybe he is referring to?  They are simply ballistic missiles.  Something S-300V series were designed to protect against.

    I saw the article, no one should take him seriously...just look at the facts here. 1.) He headed the agency back in 1994-96, not only was his tenure brief (which may speak to his incompetency, even for the 90's), he literally headed it during the time when the strategic forces were at their least capable and competent. 2.) By 91' very few things were getting updated or upgraded, meaning we're talking about a system still using 1980's computing power. The average smart-phone has more computational processing power than supercomputers of the 1980's era, let alone super computers of today, or photonic computers of the near future.
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    GarryB

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GarryB on Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:02 am

    Said it before and will say it again... the best response the Russians can make is to develop a huge warhead for IRBMs... something in the 50-100MT power range and put them on IRBMs which can pretty much be existing SRBMs like Iskander with an extra stage, or an ICBM or SLBM with one stage removed... and point them at any country in Europe with US force bases... troops or missile bases.

    Make it clear to the whole of Europe that Russia is not interested in invading any part of Europe including the Baltic states or the Ukraine or Georgia, but any country that has US troops based within their borders... even just temporarily will get IRBMS pointed at them in large numbers with the intent to obliterate the entire country and her population.

    This is nothing to do with invasion or occupation, but everything about obliterating a threat with raw fire power.

    Watch the people of europe go out on the street and ask for American forces to leave... and if they don't then that is OK too.

    They wont need to worry about living with the consequences... hahahaha.
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    magnumcromagnon

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  magnumcromagnon on Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:01 am

    GarryB wrote:Said it before and will say it again... the best response the Russians can make is to develop a huge warhead for IRBMs... something in the 50-100MT power range and put them on IRBMs which can pretty much be existing SRBMs like Iskander with an extra stage, or an ICBM or SLBM with one stage removed... and point them at any country in Europe with US force bases... troops or missile bases.

    Make it clear to the whole of Europe that Russia is not interested in invading any part of Europe including the Baltic states or the Ukraine or Georgia, but any country that has US troops based within their borders... even just temporarily will get IRBMS pointed at them in large numbers with the intent to obliterate the entire country and her population.

    This is nothing to do with invasion or occupation, but everything about obliterating a threat with raw fire power.

    Watch the people of europe go out on the street and ask for American forces to leave... and if they don't then that is OK too.

    They wont need to worry about living with the consequences... hahahaha.

    They should probably go create 2 IRBM's. One Iskander-M with a second stage, and a another 2-stage IRBM with relatively the same size of Topol-M, with a final stage that has 4 Khinzhals that detach and fly on their own. On the 2nd IRBM, the first stage will be a massive fast launching boost that could get 1000-5500km, and the warhead is made up of 4 Khinzals. The reason why I said similar in size to Topol-M is because Topol-M is 1.9 meters or 1900mm in width, and Khinzhal which is based on Iskander-M is approx. 900mm, so that 1900mm width of the Topol-M shape is just little more than twice the width, allowing roughly 4 to be placed. The Khinzals' range (2000km-4000km) is the x-factor that's not included on the stat sheet, which allows it to bridge the gap between IRBM and ICBM (something Rubezh was supposed to do).

    This allows a capability that most strategic systems wont have. It could be ICBM by utilizing the extra range from the Khinzhals to get to 6000-9500km range. If it needs to be a IRBM it will fire to 5500 km or less and all the propellant in the 4 Khinzals will be dedicated to evasive maneuvers...to best visualize their quasi-ballistic path, just picture a man with severe Parkinson's disease drawing on a piece of paper...lol1
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    GarryB

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GarryB on Wed Nov 14, 2018 6:28 am

    A missile as big as TOPOL will be expensive, both to make and to operate... they want new missiles that are relatively small but easy to hide and pack a decent punch.

    Kinzhal is just an air launched Iskander, so you are suggesting putting four Iskanders on a TOPOL... which they could already do because TOPOL is an ICBM and Iskanders on its top will just extend that range further.

    They have spent a lot of money developing new hypersonic gliders... it would make more sense to put them on an IRBM... IRBMs are not covered by the new START treaty, so they can make as many as they like so no need to fit dozens of warheads in each missile... just make more missiles.

    If you want to stack Iskanders in TOPOLS then take one stage out of the TOPOL... with the Iskanders it wont need the extra range, so instead of fitting four Iskanders you could stack 8 or 12 in there... in fact some could be put inside the sides to pop out on their way along their flight path like a MIRV warhead is released on a path to its target by the warhead bus...

    Still think the final weapon will be too big though...

    We want small and easy to hide so they think they are everywhere...
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    Hole

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  Hole on Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:14 am

    There was an article on SouthFront from a guy who explained that Amiland will have difficulties developing new IRBM´s because they no longer produce engines in that category and supposedly lost much of the capabilities to do so. The engines they use in this thrust category are all coming from… wait for it!... Russia.
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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Fri Nov 16, 2018 12:04 am

    @magnum but there is already I missile tested which can serve as IRBM - Rubezh. Surely 2000km. With small load can reach theoretically 11000km. And can carry at least 1
    avangard.
    Not sure it they will extend Iskander, perhaps it's gonna be no need for this?


    Most important is to reach US mainland. For this IRBM is not really needed.
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    GarryB

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GarryB on Fri Nov 16, 2018 10:44 am

    The value of IRBMs for Russia is that currently they have 500km range Iskander and they have ICBMs... so hitting most of Europe means wasting ICBMs, because Iskander does not have the reach for most targets in europe.

    Being able to make IRBMs means instead of using a full sized ICBM for targets less than 5,000km away they can save those all for US targets because the new Start treaty limits how many they can have and how many platforms they can operate from.

    Making IRBMs means Europe and places in the pacific like Japan and Korea and China and Hawaii can now be targeted by smaller lighter cheaper missiles and the ICBMs can be aimed at things further away.
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    Hole

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  Hole on Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:06 pm

    Start treaty will be gone soon.
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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GarryB on Sat Nov 17, 2018 1:04 am

    It doesn't expire until 2021... and to be honest once the Russians have breeder nuclear reactors operational there will be no problem making lots of nuclear warheads very rapidly, so even if Trump wont sign a continuation of new Start, the next government will.

    Of course if the democrats put hilary up against trump I could see trump winning.

    The democrats have the problem of hilary having too much power and influence... they need to kick those idiots and get someone like sanders that still has some credibility.

    Personally I would like to see Oprah Winfrey stand as an independent... she would get the votes... she is black, she is a woman, she will get all the democrat votes, but hopefully she will make americans realise that they can have more than two choices in an election...

    Previously we never hear from independents in US elections because they never have the money to be seen... major media companies really don't want to know because they have no money to throw at them and with no big business support people don't know they exist or what their policies are.

    Oprah could not possibly do a worse job than Trump or Hilary, and she might just shake things up... imagine the senate or congress saying no to her... is it because they are racist or just hate women.... hahaha... she could do no wrong...

    She should throw her hat into the ring no less that 6 months before the election so neither side (democrat or republican) will have time to create dirt on her...
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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Sat Nov 17, 2018 3:06 am

    GarryB wrote:The value of IRBMs for Russia is that currently they have 500km range Iskander and they have ICBMs... so hitting most of Europe means wasting ICBMs, because Iskander does not have the reach for most targets in europe.

    Being able to make IRBMs means instead of using a full sized ICBM for targets less than 5,000km away they can save those all for US targets because the new Start treaty limits how many they can have and how many platforms they can operate from.

    Making IRBMs means Europe and places in the pacific like Japan and Korea and China and Hawaii can now be targeted by smaller lighter cheaper missiles and the ICBMs can be aimed at things further away.

    China nor Korea is in foreseeable future no enemy of Russia. As for IRBM Russia already has one: Rubezh. Why do you think it is more expensive then new IRBM? Rubezh is bigger then Soviet Kurier but IMHO because its warhead can be Avangard.
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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GarryB on Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:29 am

    As for IRBM Russia already has one: Rubezh.

    If that were true they they would already be violating the INF treaty.

    The fact is that any ICBM can be loaded up with a super heavy payload that shortens its range to IRBM range... it could also be fired on a lofted trajectory or depressed trajectory and also be an intermediate range weapon.

    You can make all the claims you want but Rubezh will be an ICBM.

    The Russian army has Iskanders in service... with the INF treaty gone they will extend the range because the only reason its range was limited to 500km was the INF treaty.

    Their C4IR capacity has dramatically improved over the last few years so having IRBMs would be useful... their satellite network is also improving so their ability to find targets at intermediate range should be actually very good.

    Regarding hitting China... I am including Taiwan, and regarding Korea I am actually meaning US bases in south korea... and Japan.

    Rubezh is bigger then Soviet Kurier but IMHO because its warhead can be Avangard.

    Well there you go then... how many other Russian missiles have gotten bigger?

    Iskander is tiny compared with the Scud missiles it is replacing and vastly more accurate, not to mention two per vehicle...
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    George1

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:55 pm

    Putin, defense ministry’s top officials discuss US’ possible withdrawal from INF Treaty

    The Russian leader pledged that Moscow would "naturally" respond to such a step

    SOCHI, November 19. /TASS/. The United States’ possible withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty was in focus of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s meeting with senior officials of the Russian defense ministry on Monday.

    The president pledged that Moscow would respond to such a step.

    "Naturally, the United States’ decision to withdraw from this treaty can not be left unanswered on our part," he said.


    More:
    http://tass.com/politics/1031577
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    George1

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 26, 2018 9:42 pm

    Russia insists it is in compliance with the INF Treaty



    On November 26, 2018, Sergey Ryabkov, Deputy Foreign Minister, held a briefing in Moscow that was devoted to the INF Treaty. As far as I can tell, the briefing was supposed to outline Russia's official position on the INF treaty. Ryabkov made a few interesting statements that seem to add more uncertainty to the dispute about the treaty (although the fate of the treaty seems to be certain at this point - it won't survive).

    First of all, Ryabkov strongly rejected U.S. allegations of non-compliance and said that Russia is committed to preserving the treaty (provided that the United States complies with the treaty, he added). On the details of the accusation, Ryabkov largely confirmed what we have already known.

    In my view, the most important point made by Ryabkov is that he insisted that Russia hasn't tested the 9M729 missile to the INF range. Moreover, it appears that this is how Russia has built its defense - since the missile hasn't been tested to the prohibited range, it is treaty-compliant. But, unfortunately for Russia, this is not how the letter of the treaty works - for a missile to be in violation it is sufficient that it has the "range capability." And this is exactly what the United States has been saying (in a recent testimony in the Senate, the Pentagon said that Russia tested the missile "well into the ranges covered by the INF Treaty", but I don't trust this statement).

    According to Ryabkov, 9M729 is a modification of the 9M728 missile of the Iskander-M system. It was tested to its maximum range at the Kapustin Yar test site on 18 September 2017. In that test the missile flew to the range of "less than 480 km." Interestingly, he said that the modernization "dealt with, first of all, with the missile warhead." This, however, contradicts other data that suggest that the 9M729 is about 1.8 meters longer than 9M728 (so it is a "8-meter missile" similar to Kalibr). But it doesn't rule it out.

    Indirectly, Ryabkov confirmed that the United States refer to "range capability" rather than the demonstrated range in its allegations - he said that at some point the United States suggested that the tests were treaty-compliant only because the missile was not fully fueled. To answer that Russia apparently "illuminated specific features of the missile's fuel system that rule out experiments like that." It's hard to tell exactly what this "illumination" involved, though - it is possible that Russia shared some information with the United States, but in general I don't expect that sharing more information would help Russia make its case.

    Ryabkov effectively confirmed, although he didn't say it directly, that the United States believes that 9M729 was tested from the Iskander-M launcher (he called it a "universal chassis that is used in a wide range of missile launchers"). This, of course, would make any discussion of returning to compliance extremely difficult.

    The bottom line is that we are very much where we were before the briefing. Since Russia hasn't tested the missile to the INF range it believes that it is in compliance or at least that it has plausible deniability. The United States appears to have some pretty solid intelligence data that show that 9M729 has the INF range capability (as I mentioned some time ago, for all we know, the United States has the blueprints of the missile; ironically, this might indeed be the case). But, as a colleague observed, intelligence data cannot be used as a proof for the purposes of the treaty.

    I remain convinced that U.S. evidence of the violation is not particularly strong (blueprints notwithstanding). While Russia may be technically in violation, this violation is not nearly as grave as it is portrayed and is definitely not serious enough to warrant dismantlement of the INF treaty

    (Ryabkov also described Russia's counteraccusations, but these would warrant a separate post.)


    http://russianforces.org/blog/2018/11/russia_insists_it_is_in_compli.shtml
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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  LMFS on Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:03 pm

    George1 wrote:The United States appears to have some pretty solid intelligence data that show that 9M729 has the INF range capability
    "Solid intelligence" as the one they had for Kalibr pre Syrian campaign I guess Suspect
    What US has is a dire need to make Russia guilty of the treaty failure, since they are themselves in flagrant breach for many reasons.

    After failing in their nuclear blackmail attempt via ABM shield, West will try the next best possibility: threaten or execute conventional attack on Russia under the presumption that Russia will attack pre-emptively when a certain threat threshold is reached and prefer to suffer the attrition of a conventional war in the European theatre (with the convenient destruction of its territory and a good part of Europe to keep both down for the next generations), instead of going nuclear and unleashing the end of the world. That is (irremediably?) where this escalation of hostilities is leading. Hence why Putin already made clear they are not interested in a world without Russia and that they are ready to die like martyrs. His hand should not tremble to rise the stakes as much as needed, no victory will be possible for West and their propaganda machine once they do not exist any more.
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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:25 pm

    hmmm at this blog quoted by Georgev-> my comment about authors? Смерш

    1) nobody singed this post

    2) below is what I've found about one of books translations


    The research project that allowed keeping the book up-to-date was supported by the John Merck Fund.
    The translation and publication of the book were supported by the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    with a grant from the W. Alton Jones Foundation.

    3) about authors of site


    Pavel Podvig
    graduated from the General and Applied Physics Department of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) in 1988. Since 1991 he works as a Researcher at the Center for Arms Control, Energy and Environmental Studies at MIPT.

    https://www.jmfund.org/grant/center-for-arms-control-energy-and-environmental-studiesmoscow-institute-of-physics-and-technology-2/

    THE JOHN MERCK FUND
    COPYRIGHT 2018 THE JOHN MERCK FUND SITE DESIGN



    Boris Zhelezov
    graduated from the Moscow Institute of Communications in 1985. Since 1989 he worked at the U.S. and Canada Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, where he receive his Ph.D. in political sciences in 1994. Boris Zhelezov works on problems of civil-military relations and various political and legal aspects of arms control. Since 1998 he works with the Open Society Institute in Moscow
    .

    In short Soros' dude
    https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/



    Igor Sutyagin

    graduated from the Moscow State University (Physics Department) in 1988 and since then has worked at the Institute of U.S. and Canada Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In 1995 he received his Ph. D. in history from the U.S. and Canada Institute.



    Eugene Miasnikov
    received his Ph.D. in physics (oceanography) from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1989. In 1991 he joined the Center for Arms Control Studies and started working on history and role of a strategic naval fleet and i




    about center:

    https://armscontrolcenter.org/about/

    The Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation
    820 1st Street NE, Suite LL-180
    Washington, D.C. 20002



    Timur Kadyshev
    received his Ph.D. in mathematical modeling from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1991. The subject of his thesis was mathematical models of strategic stability. His current research focuses on history and the current status of the strategic aviation and arms-control and security issues raised by ballistic missile proliferation. Since 1991 Timur Kadyshev works at the Center for Arms Control Studies.

    Oleg Bukharin
    received his Ph. D. in physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1992. He has also received training in international relations from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, and was a researcher at the Center for Arms Control, Energy and Environmental Studies at MIPT from 1991 to 1992. Currently Dr. Bukharin is a researcher at the Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton University




    Maxim Tarasenko
    received his Ph.D. in physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1988. Since 1991 he worked at the Center for Arms Control Studies. Maxim Tarasenko was widely recognized as a leading expert in the Soviet civilian and military space program. He wrote extensively on these subjects. Among his publications are the book Military Dimension of the Soviet Space Program (in Russian) as well as numerous publications about the history and the current status of the Soviet/Russian space program. Maxim Tarasenko wrote the fourth chapter that is devoted to strategic land-based missile forces and parts of the fifth chapter that deal with sea-launched ballistic missiles. In May 1999 Maxim Tarasenko died in a car accident.

    accident you say comrade Beria?
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    GarryB

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GarryB on Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:56 am

    The missile has a greatly enlarged warhead so no level of fuelling would give it a range of more than 480km, so it is treaty compliant.

    The AEGIS Ashore system the US has installed in Europe has the Mk-41 launch tubes able to launch SM-3 SAMs, but also Tomahawk cruise missiles that violate the INF treaty.

    They also recently revealed information about tests that involve the use of a target that also violates the INF treaty too.

    The fact is that the US Navy is leading the US military programme to develop a hypersonic glider that is intended to eventually be compatible with Mk-41 launch tubes and also eventually be used in land and air launched versions that will all break the INF treaty so they want to rip it up now... blaming Russia for violating it is just an excuse... if proved wrong they will just say it is an outdated cold war relic anyway.
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    Hole

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  Hole on Wed Nov 28, 2018 10:53 am

    Like with the ABM treaty. Under Clinton they started development of ABM systems, as they were nearing readiness, Bush the lesser scrapped the treaty.
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    GunshipDemocracy

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Wed Nov 28, 2018 1:39 pm

    Hole wrote:Bush the lesser scrapped the treaty.


    respekt respekt respekt

    damn you Hole, I've spilled coffee on my keyboard laughing

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    Re: INF Treaty - coming to the end of its life

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