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    Russian Foreign Policy in the Middle East

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    George1
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    Re: Russian Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    Post  George1 on Tue 04 Oct 2016, 08:33

    Russian MP says Moscow may push antiterrorist war in Middle East to end

    A Russian lawmaker says after the US decision to suspend contacts on Syria, Russia can take the issue into own hands and push the antiterrorist war to an end

    MOSCOW, October 4. /TASS/. Russia may push the antiterrorist war in the Middle East through to an end after the latest informational provocations and official statements from the U.S., First Deputy Speaker of the State Duma, Ivan Melnikov told TASS on Monday.

    "After the recent informational provocations and official statements from the U.S. we can untie our own hands and push the antiterrorist war in the Middle East through to an end," said Melnikov, who is one of the top decision-makers in the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (CPRF). He voiced the confidence this would meet the interests of Russia, Europe and the rationally thinking Americans in an equal measure.

    "Otherwise this was spread much broader than today," he said.

    Melnikov recalled that the military operation of the Russian Aerospace Force against the terrorist organization had been very efficacious.

    "We suspended it and took up the peace process quite conscientiously, as we expected mutual understanding with the so-called allies in struggle with terrorism," he said.

    "Yet time has shown the U.S. is playing a double game as regards Russia," Melnikov said. "To suit its interest, the U.S. supports directly or indirectly the forces that seed destruction, bloodshed and chaos. It wants to protect from destruction the big numbers of terrorists and keep them up."

    All of this has become very apparent now, he said.

    Earlier on Monday, the chief of the U.S. Department of State press service, John Kirby, said the U.S. was suspending the use of bilateral channels with Russia that had been established to help serve the ceasefire in Syria.

    He also said the U.S. was revoking the personnel that was supposed to take up in the setting-up of a join executive center.


    More:
    http://tass.com/politics/903958?_ga=1.123378507.1337049799.1447427261


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    George1
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    Re: Russian Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    Post  George1 on Sun 16 Oct 2016, 23:48

    This is a CIA old report from 80s about USSR's goals in Middle East and its relations with various states.
    Although its from a foreign perspective it is interesting to compare the background of USSR/Russia relations with M.East states from the past to present.

    https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/DOC_0000499549.pdf

    Russian policy defines 3 areas

    1. Middle East the non-arab countries of Iran and Turkey
    2. Near East the countries of Levant, Iraq, Egypt and Arabian Peninsula and
    3. North Afircan countries of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya

    Soviet Policy goals were:
    1. Blocking any US-sponsored Arab-Israeli peace settlement that leaves Moscow out and optimally, regaining a voice in the peace process
    2. Unifying the Arabs into a pro-Soviet front ending the isolation of USSR's allied states of Syria, S.Yemen and Libya
    3. Stemming the drift of Algeria and Iraq towards on lesser dependence with Soviet Union and to closer ties with the US
    4. Expanding influence in Egypt and Iran. Two important regional targets
    5. Eroding Turkey's security ties with the United States

    Lets compare that goals then with today's background
    1. Russia is part of Middle East quartet. The group was established in in 2002, as a result of the escalating conflict in the Middle East.
    2. Russia's allied states today can be considered Syria and Iran after 90s. Libya is lost and Yemen is in unstable situation years now
    3. Algeria and Iraq have made big arms deals with Russia today and have much more dependence for arms on Russia than on US. From the other hand the have close economic relations with USA.
    4. This goal has been almost fully achieved, since Iran is a Russian ally in region and Egypt has moved to closer ties with Moscow last years after General Sisi takeover of power. Economic deals, arms deals, joint military exercises have balanced previous decades of US influence
    5. Turkeys security ties are eroding to US because of Erdogan's policies and not because of Russia'a actions. We will see how this will be evoluted


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    RedJasmin
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    Re: Russian Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    Post  RedJasmin on Sun 23 Oct 2016, 02:21

    George1 wrote:This is a CIA old report from 80s about USSR's goals in Middle East and its relations with various states.
    Although its from a foreign perspective it is interesting to compare the background of USSR/Russia relations with M.East states from the past to present.

    https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/DOC_0000499549.pdf

    Russian policy defines 3 areas

    1. Middle East the non-arab countries of Iran and Turkey
    2. Near East the countries of Levant, Iraq, Egypt and Arabian Peninsula and
    3. North Afircan countries of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya

    Soviet Policy goals were:
    1. Blocking any US-sponsored Arab-Israeli peace settlement that leaves Moscow out and optimally, regaining a voice in the peace process
    2. Unifying the Arabs into a pro-Soviet front ending the isolation of USSR's allied states of Syria, S.Yemen and Libya
    3. Stemming the drift of Algeria and Iraq towards on lesser dependence with Soviet Union and to closer ties with the US
    4. Expanding influence in Egypt and Iran. Two important regional targets
    5. Eroding Turkey's security ties with the United States

    Lets compare that goals then with today's background
    1. Russia is part of Middle East quartet. The group was established in in 2002, as a result of the escalating conflict in the Middle East.
    2. Russia's allied states today can be considered Syria and Iran after 90s. Libya is lost and Yemen is in unstable situation years now
    3. Algeria and Iraq have made big arms deals with Russia today and have much more dependence for arms on Russia than on US. From the other hand the have close economic relations with USA.
    4. This goal has been almost fully achieved, since Iran is a Russian ally in region and Egypt has moved to closer ties with Moscow last years after General Sisi takeover of power. Economic deals, arms deals, joint military exercises have balanced previous decades of US influence
    5. Turkeys security ties are eroding to US because of Erdogan's policies and not because of Russia'a actions. We will see how this will be evoluted

    Very interesting. Considering today's background, I think some positives and negatives to be taken on board from the current situation.

    1. The quartet is effectively dead, as any Palestinian peace deal looks miles away. I think Russia's efforts here would be best spent trying to get Hamas and Fatah to present a united front, and providing meaningful economic development assistance, so that in the event of a settlement in the future, Russia could have a new ally based on genuine historical ties and support. It's an investment in the future.

    2. Aiding civilians in Yemen to preserve a valuable ally could be helpful here. Russian interests would be strengthened considerably by having the goodwill of the population, and would be a strong gesture. More robustly, Russia could support the Houthi government factions with defensive weaponry and general logistical equipment (i.e. anti-aircraft weapons to resist Saudi airstrikes, APCs etc). Russia really does need to regain some traction Yemen.

    3. This has been some of the most positive developments of the last few years. Especially with Algeria, Russia needs to work hard to both broaden and deepen this progress into general economic and geo-political alliance. A strategic ally in the Western Mediterranean would be a significant step forward. Russia's energy sector expertise could be really utilised here to great mutual benefit.

    4. Iran is now a solid ally, but Egypt needs careful diplomacy to really make an impact. I'd be cautious to celebrate too early.

    5. For Russia, Turkey is the best news she's had in a long time. Keep at the good work at loosing friends and alienating people, Erdogan... Sometimes, your enemies really do just start hitting themselves repeatedly in the face while you just sit there and watch. Now is one of those times.


    George1
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    Re: Russian Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    Post  George1 on Sun 13 Nov 2016, 12:39

    Medvedev arrives in Jericho for Russian-Palestinian talks

    JERICHO, November 11. /TASS/. Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev has arrived in the city Jericho. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas greeted the Russian premier and members of the delegation. The Russian-Palestinian talks have started.

    Medvedev and Abbas are due to sign a number of bilateral agreements during their meeting. "New bilateral documents are planned to be signed on the sidelines of my visit to Palestine," Medvedev said in his article for the Palestinian media. "An even more favorable atmosphere is being created for joint onward progress, bilateral investment, cooperation in industry, agriculture, trade and culture."

    The Russian prime minister said that Russia and Palestine "pay special attention" to strengthening economic cooperation, that develops despite "unfavorable factors related to a complicated military and political situation, as well as regional instability."


    More:
    http://tass.com/politics/911750


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