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    Englishman here

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    DickSharpe
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    Englishman here

    Post  DickSharpe on Sat Feb 11, 2012 3:57 pm

    Hello all, I have a great interest in military affairs, in fact a lot of my fiction writing is geared towards it.

    The main reason I joined this board is because I am considering joining the Russian military in a few years (when I am 25-26) after I have completed a degree course (likely in languages or history)

    Hopefully I can learn more on here, especially about any prospects for obtaining a commission. Look forward to speaking to you all.

    GarryB
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  GarryB on Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:21 am

    welcome Smile

    DickSharpe
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  DickSharpe on Sun Feb 12, 2012 2:38 pm

    GarryB wrote: welcome Smile

    Thanks Garry, and thanks for the replies to my other posts. You know your stuff!

    GarryB
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  GarryB on Mon Feb 13, 2012 3:05 am

    I learn as much as I share.... Smile

    There are several knowledgeable people here, like Vlad, Mindstorm, SOC, TR-1... in no particular order, and there are others who supply lots of information and pics too like Austin and Russian Patriot and Medo... I shouldn't have made such a list as I am sure I will exclude someone important and hurt their feelings or put them in the wrong list.

    Even people I disagree with are interesting to talk to, and can contribute to a discussion and I don't think just because they disagree with me that they are wrong or stupid or anything. Smile

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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  Russian Patriot on Wed Feb 15, 2012 2:31 am

    Welcome mate , be a good gent (following rules ) and you will enjoy this forum greatly.

    flamming_python
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  flamming_python on Wed Feb 15, 2012 9:52 pm

    Hi DickSharpe! (big fan of that series BTW)

    You know it's funny; I was born in Russia but lived in England since I was a kid, and then eventually returned to Russia and joined the Russian military myself. So, anything's possible. However, the situation for me was perhaps somewhat different, because I am a Russian citizen and as such was technically obligated to join and do the mandatory conscript service; regardless of where I've actually been all these years (they were still surprised to see someone like me though, you can bet Cool). And after that I was offered to stay on as a contract serviceman - but that's something I kindly declined, had my own plans and stuff you know...

    Are you of Russian origin? What's your story? If you don't have Russian citizenship - there has been talk for several years now about the setting up of a foreign legion - but AFAIK nothing concrete has been formed yet. If it is - then I guess that it will be targeted at the ex-Soviet/CIS countries first and foremost, but certainly they should still let you through; the fact that I also had British citizenship raised a few questions but nothing more than that. Outside of that - I honestly don't know under what conditions (if any) they let foreign citizens serve in the Russian military. Perhaps it's possible.

    If BTW you do have Russian citizenship, just make sure you don't miss the boat, as it stands conscription age is 18-27, once you are 28 you are no longer eligible (there have been proposals to raise the age limit to 30 though).

    And obtaining a commission? Well man that just beats all - but definitely best of luck to you mate. If you have any questions, ask.

    DickSharpe
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  DickSharpe on Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:17 pm

    flamming_python wrote:Hi DickSharpe! (big fan of that series BTW)

    You know it's funny; I was born in Russia but lived in England since I was a kid, and then eventually returned to Russia and joined the Russian military myself. So, anything's possible. However, the situation for me was perhaps somewhat different, because I am a Russian citizen and as such was technically obligated to join and do the mandatory conscript service; regardless of where I've actually been all these years (they were still surprised to see someone like me though, you can bet Cool). And after that I was offered to stay on as a contract serviceman - but that's something I kindly declined, had my own plans and stuff you know...

    Are you of Russian origin? What's your story? If you don't have Russian citizenship - there has been talk for several years now about the setting up of a foreign legion - but AFAIK nothing concrete has been formed yet. If it is - then I guess that it will be targeted at the ex-Soviet/CIS countries first and foremost, but certainly they should still let you through; the fact that I also had British citizenship raised a few questions but nothing more than that. Outside of that - I honestly don't know under what conditions (if any) they let foreign citizens serve in the Russian military. Perhaps it's possible.

    If BTW you do have Russian citizenship, just make sure you don't miss the boat, as it stands conscription age is 18-27, once you are 28 you are no longer eligible (there have been proposals to raise the age limit to 30 though).

    And obtaining a commission? Well man that just beats all - but definitely best of luck to you mate. If you have any questions, ask.

    I am a British citizen and a native by blood, stretching back to the ice age even. I have no strong blood or citizen-based ties to Russia. Its just politics and respect for a bettr contry in general that motivates me.

    I saw a astroy saying that they accept anyone who speaks Russian, as I intend to join ina few years that leaves me some time to learn it. I'm 22 as of last week, and I have a lot of intelligence even if my fitness neds improving.

    What are the conditions for being commissioned, I would guess it says on the website, but as I said I have no Russian yet.

    flamming_python
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  flamming_python on Thu Feb 16, 2012 10:43 pm

    DickSharpe wrote:I am a British citizen and a native by blood, stretching back to the ice age even. I have no strong blood or citizen-based ties to Russia. Its just politics and respect for a bettr contry in general that motivates me.

    I saw a astroy saying that they accept anyone who speaks Russian, as I intend to join ina few years that leaves me some time to learn it. I'm 22 as of last week, and I have a lot of intelligence even if my fitness neds improving.

    What are the conditions for being commissioned, I would guess it says on the website, but as I said I have no Russian yet.

    Interesting story and motivation, but I won't lie - it will attract suspicion. Still, people there are humans too - even if they will always keep an eye on you and won't let you into some sensitive roles or positions, they will accept you if they see that you are genuine. Either way, you will be something of a local celebrity and quite popular with the ladies who live in your garrison, I might add ^^

    As for the language - well you better get cracking. With me, at one point when I was a kid, my level of Russian got so low that I was simply too shy to speak it (and wouldn't make too much sense even if I would), could barely read and certainly couldn't write. But about 7 years before I returned and joined the military, I started actively working on it. The result was that it was relatively fluent by the time I joined, and is basically near native now after I left, just the faint trace of an accent remains. I think to be honest - it will be difficult for you to get your Russian up to the necessary level over even 4-5 years, unless you are very motivated and work very hard towards it in your spare time. Studying it as your degree could give you the needed boost, but even better - you can consider doing that degree course you are thinking about in Russia. That way you will not only pull up your knowledge of the lingo, but it would offer you a very valuable insight into the country and allow you to get assimilated into the culture to a sufficient degree. And that is very important in the Russian military, you will be in a tight collective mostly with people that have never traveled beyond the borders of Russia before, whether you join as an officer or as a kontrabas (there's an important word for you, it's slang for contract serviceman). It's a big step of course just going and studying in a foreign country that you don't speak the language of, but if you are serious about your ambition, it will help prepare you for the leap of faith you will have to take to actually go and join the Russian army.

    Physical fitness - I don't know about officers, but for Russian contract servicemen the physical requirements are nothing to laugh at no matter what your actual role will be. Make sure you can do at least 15-20 pull-ups, palms facing away from you, at least 50-60 proper push-ups, same number of sit-ups, and be able to run 3km in 12 mins or so, perhaps even less. It all works on a points system, so there is some leeway to be had if you are better at one thing and worse at another. There are actually about 60-70 possible different physical tests defined (although you will only be tested on a few of them), but I suspect in practice there are certain ones that you will be far more likely to be assessed on; and for that reason - pull-ups, push-ups, sit-ups, med-distance running; make sure you can do them all well.

    DickSharpe
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  DickSharpe on Sat Feb 18, 2012 9:02 pm

    flamming_python wrote:
    DickSharpe wrote:I am a British citizen and a native by blood, stretching back to the ice age even. I have no strong blood or citizen-based ties to Russia. Its just politics and respect for a bettr contry in general that motivates me.

    I saw a astroy saying that they accept anyone who speaks Russian, as I intend to join ina few years that leaves me some time to learn it. I'm 22 as of last week, and I have a lot of intelligence even if my fitness neds improving.

    What are the conditions for being commissioned, I would guess it says on the website, but as I said I have no Russian yet.

    Interesting story and motivation, but I won't lie - it will attract suspicion. Still, people there are humans too - even if they will always keep an eye on you and won't let you into some sensitive roles or positions, they will accept you if they see that you are genuine. Either way, you will be something of a local celebrity and quite popular with the ladies who live in your garrison, I might add ^^

    As for the language - well you better get cracking. With me, at one point when I was a kid, my level of Russian got so low that I was simply too shy to speak it (and wouldn't make too much sense even if I would), could barely read and certainly couldn't write. But about 7 years before I returned and joined the military, I started actively working on it. The result was that it was relatively fluent by the time I joined, and is basically near native now after I left, just the faint trace of an accent remains. I think to be honest - it will be difficult for you to get your Russian up to the necessary level over even 4-5 years, unless you are very motivated and work very hard towards it in your spare time. Studying it as your degree could give you the needed boost, but even better - you can consider doing that degree course you are thinking about in Russia. That way you will not only pull up your knowledge of the lingo, but it would offer you a very valuable insight into the country and allow you to get assimilated into the culture to a sufficient degree. And that is very important in the Russian military, you will be in a tight collective mostly with people that have never traveled beyond the borders of Russia before, whether you join as an officer or as a kontrabas (there's an important word for you, it's slang for contract serviceman). It's a big step of course just going and studying in a foreign country that you don't speak the language of, but if you are serious about your ambition, it will help prepare you for the leap of faith you will have to take to actually go and join the Russian army.

    Physical fitness - I don't know about officers, but for Russian contract servicemen the physical requirements are nothing to laugh at no matter what your actual role will be. Make sure you can do at least 15-20 pull-ups, palms facing away from you, at least 50-60 proper push-ups, same number of sit-ups, and be able to run 3km in 12 mins or so, perhaps even less. It all works on a points system, so there is some leeway to be had if you are better at one thing and worse at another. There are actually about 60-70 possible different physical tests defined (although you will only be tested on a few of them), but I suspect in practice there are certain ones that you will be far more likely to be assessed on; and for that reason - pull-ups, push-ups, sit-ups, med-distance running; make sure you can do them all well.

    Those are certainly tough fitness standards, makes the British army look soft. Three kilometres in twelve minutes seems a bit rough. I will certainly work hard at it anyway.

    flamming_python
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  flamming_python on Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:08 pm

    DickSharpe wrote:
    flamming_python wrote:
    DickSharpe wrote:I am a British citizen and a native by blood, stretching back to the ice age even. I have no strong blood or citizen-based ties to Russia. Its just politics and respect for a bettr contry in general that motivates me.

    I saw a astroy saying that they accept anyone who speaks Russian, as I intend to join ina few years that leaves me some time to learn it. I'm 22 as of last week, and I have a lot of intelligence even if my fitness neds improving.

    What are the conditions for being commissioned, I would guess it says on the website, but as I said I have no Russian yet.

    Interesting story and motivation, but I won't lie - it will attract suspicion. Still, people there are humans too - even if they will always keep an eye on you and won't let you into some sensitive roles or positions, they will accept you if they see that you are genuine. Either way, you will be something of a local celebrity and quite popular with the ladies who live in your garrison, I might add ^^

    As for the language - well you better get cracking. With me, at one point when I was a kid, my level of Russian got so low that I was simply too shy to speak it (and wouldn't make too much sense even if I would), could barely read and certainly couldn't write. But about 7 years before I returned and joined the military, I started actively working on it. The result was that it was relatively fluent by the time I joined, and is basically near native now after I left, just the faint trace of an accent remains. I think to be honest - it will be difficult for you to get your Russian up to the necessary level over even 4-5 years, unless you are very motivated and work very hard towards it in your spare time. Studying it as your degree could give you the needed boost, but even better - you can consider doing that degree course you are thinking about in Russia. That way you will not only pull up your knowledge of the lingo, but it would offer you a very valuable insight into the country and allow you to get assimilated into the culture to a sufficient degree. And that is very important in the Russian military, you will be in a tight collective mostly with people that have never traveled beyond the borders of Russia before, whether you join as an officer or as a kontrabas (there's an important word for you, it's slang for contract serviceman). It's a big step of course just going and studying in a foreign country that you don't speak the language of, but if you are serious about your ambition, it will help prepare you for the leap of faith you will have to take to actually go and join the Russian army.

    Physical fitness - I don't know about officers, but for Russian contract servicemen the physical requirements are nothing to laugh at no matter what your actual role will be. Make sure you can do at least 15-20 pull-ups, palms facing away from you, at least 50-60 proper push-ups, same number of sit-ups, and be able to run 3km in 12 mins or so, perhaps even less. It all works on a points system, so there is some leeway to be had if you are better at one thing and worse at another. There are actually about 60-70 possible different physical tests defined (although you will only be tested on a few of them), but I suspect in practice there are certain ones that you will be far more likely to be assessed on; and for that reason - pull-ups, push-ups, sit-ups, med-distance running; make sure you can do them all well.

    Those are certainly tough fitness standards, makes the British army look soft. Three kilometres in twelve minutes seems a bit rough. I will certainly work hard at it anyway.

    Hardest things will be the pull-ups, the English P.E program in schools, and the training for various sports teams, etc... include absolutely no training or practise in pull-ups whatsoever. Whereas in Russian schools AFAIK the guys do them quite a bit; and accordingly in the Russian military they attach a good amount of value to them.

    For the 3km, if you are overweight, just drop the kilos and get into shape; you'll be surprised by just how much your time improves once you've shaved off even a few pounds.

    If you can do all that to the standards I described; you may scrape a 4 (good). You only need a 3 (acceptable) to pass, but that is only a little lower so either way, you're going to have to work hard at it. Definately if you want to have any sort of combat role; they will probably expect a 4 or a 5 from you.

    DickSharpe
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    Posts : 7
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    Re: Englishman here

    Post  DickSharpe on Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:37 pm

    flamming_python wrote:
    DickSharpe wrote:
    flamming_python wrote:
    DickSharpe wrote:I am a British citizen and a native by blood, stretching back to the ice age even. I have no strong blood or citizen-based ties to Russia. Its just politics and respect for a bettr contry in general that motivates me.

    I saw a astroy saying that they accept anyone who speaks Russian, as I intend to join ina few years that leaves me some time to learn it. I'm 22 as of last week, and I have a lot of intelligence even if my fitness neds improving.

    What are the conditions for being commissioned, I would guess it says on the website, but as I said I have no Russian yet.

    Interesting story and motivation, but I won't lie - it will attract suspicion. Still, people there are humans too - even if they will always keep an eye on you and won't let you into some sensitive roles or positions, they will accept you if they see that you are genuine. Either way, you will be something of a local celebrity and quite popular with the ladies who live in your garrison, I might add ^^

    As for the language - well you better get cracking. With me, at one point when I was a kid, my level of Russian got so low that I was simply too shy to speak it (and wouldn't make too much sense even if I would), could barely read and certainly couldn't write. But about 7 years before I returned and joined the military, I started actively working on it. The result was that it was relatively fluent by the time I joined, and is basically near native now after I left, just the faint trace of an accent remains. I think to be honest - it will be difficult for you to get your Russian up to the necessary level over even 4-5 years, unless you are very motivated and work very hard towards it in your spare time. Studying it as your degree could give you the needed boost, but even better - you can consider doing that degree course you are thinking about in Russia. That way you will not only pull up your knowledge of the lingo, but it would offer you a very valuable insight into the country and allow you to get assimilated into the culture to a sufficient degree. And that is very important in the Russian military, you will be in a tight collective mostly with people that have never traveled beyond the borders of Russia before, whether you join as an officer or as a kontrabas (there's an important word for you, it's slang for contract serviceman). It's a big step of course just going and studying in a foreign country that you don't speak the language of, but if you are serious about your ambition, it will help prepare you for the leap of faith you will have to take to actually go and join the Russian army.

    Physical fitness - I don't know about officers, but for Russian contract servicemen the physical requirements are nothing to laugh at no matter what your actual role will be. Make sure you can do at least 15-20 pull-ups, palms facing away from you, at least 50-60 proper push-ups, same number of sit-ups, and be able to run 3km in 12 mins or so, perhaps even less. It all works on a points system, so there is some leeway to be had if you are better at one thing and worse at another. There are actually about 60-70 possible different physical tests defined (although you will only be tested on a few of them), but I suspect in practice there are certain ones that you will be far more likely to be assessed on; and for that reason - pull-ups, push-ups, sit-ups, med-distance running; make sure you can do them all well.

    Those are certainly tough fitness standards, makes the British army look soft. Three kilometres in twelve minutes seems a bit rough. I will certainly work hard at it anyway.

    Hardest things will be the pull-ups, the English P.E program in schools, and the training for various sports teams, etc... include absolutely no training or practise in pull-ups whatsoever. Whereas in Russian schools AFAIK the guys do them quite a bit; and accordingly in the Russian military they attach a good amount of value to them.

    For the 3km, if you are overweight, just drop the kilos and get into shape; you'll be surprised by just how much your time improves once you've shaved off even a few pounds.

    If you can do all that to the standards I described; you may scrape a 4 (good). You only need a 3 (acceptable) to pass, but that is only a little lower so either way, you're going to have to work hard at it. Definately if you want to have any sort of combat role; they will probably expect a 4 or a 5 from you.

    I can imagine, I know I can do the press ups and sit ups with a bit of training. The run is certainly doable. I am quite skinny so I can run fast, I do worry that I get short of breath too esily though. The pull ups will be hell, I can manage about six. when I was toying with the idea of joining the British army, it seemed to be better than average. The Russian army must be tough, I suppose with a population to draw from the size of Russias, they can be very picky.

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