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    Yak-130: News

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    George1

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  George1 on Tue Jul 31, 2018 11:59 pm

    "31", "35", "36"







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    Nibiru

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  Nibiru on Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:40 am

    is it possible to modify Yak-130 to match the capabilities of the Korean T-50 to compete with it on the global market?
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    GunshipDemocracy

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  GunshipDemocracy on Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:18 pm

    Nibiru wrote:is it possible to modify Yak-130 to match the capabilities of the Korean T-50 to compete with it on the global market?

    not sure what do you mean by to modify? for whom? it is designed to meet Russian AF specs. Taing into account its Italian M-346 derivative Israeli, Italian or Polish one.
    If you mean speed? Yak 133 never materialize d for a reason - was not needed.

    Hongdu L-15 is actually Yak 230 in supersonic version lol1 lol1 lol1
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    Hole

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  Hole on Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:27 pm

    Yak-130 has already been sold to Algeria, Belarus, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Syria.

    william.boutros

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  william.boutros on Wed Aug 29, 2018 8:44 pm

    Nibiru wrote:is it possible to modify Yak-130 to match the capabilities of the Korean T-50 to compete with it on the global market?

    ًA supersonic trainer may not be of added value, where will it be used? A single engine fighter-bomber in the F-16 weight could be a good option for many countries. I suspect the reason for not developing it is to prevent it from eating the sales of Su-27-30-35 in specific markets. The latter's development being more important to the Russian Armed Forces.


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    GarryB

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Aug 30, 2018 8:40 am

    It takes a lot of fuel and a lot of time to accelerate to supersonic speed... most aircraft spend very little time at supersonic speed... it is most useful for interceptors, but most of the time with a full weapons load most aircraft are subsonic most of the time...

    Flying straight and level in full AB makes you an easy target for long range IR guided missiles like R-27ET...

    Besides... if you want to make it a light fighter then you need a complete EW package too which makes it expensive or weak if you choose to not fit it.

    For strike missions a belly mounted targeting pod and iron bombs from medium altitude would be useful with minimal alterations... but you could equally hang such a targeting pod from a medium transport type with longer range and enormous potential payload...

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    d_taddei2

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  d_taddei2 on Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:44 pm

    Yak-130 is perfectly capable of being light multirole fighter if equipment is fitted to it. A low cost cheap to run in comparison to su family if you're need is for such a light fighter then why not. It all depends on your needs and threat. I suspect that there is a market for it in South America and Africa. It's ideal for patrolling with recce pods saves you using up flying hours or more expensive aircraft. Of course if you want the next step up u have mig-29m2 then onto mig-35 su family etc. Currently Russia is missing the market for this category.

    And as Gary says if you wanted to deliver a huge payload for cheap an IL-76, An-12, An-22 kitted out with svp systems etc you now h avec a hideous amount of cheap bombs in the air with a 3-5m accuracy. Imagine what a An-22 could do with that system. You could even put it on lighter aircraft such as An-24/26, An-32, An-74 if you really wanted any cargo plane really. Would have been useful in Iraq and Syria
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    GarryB

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Sep 07, 2018 9:48 am

    Yak-130 is perfectly capable of being light multirole fighter if equipment is fitted to it.

    The real problem is that some people think it would be a good fighter... and it likely would merely be band aide solution.

    Keep in mind that while being relatively light and cheap compared with an expensive medium or heavy fighter, and also relatively manouverable, it would also be largely blind and short ranged and unable to keep up with other aircraft.

    Against strike aircraft with target information coming from ground control or AWACS, it could fly at medium altitude at high subsonic speed with some R-77s and some R-73s... so basically a MiG-29S armament, but without the radar and without the self defence avionics... you could send it out to engage enemy bombers and indeed incoming cruise missiles... but actually targeting those would not be 100% easy or reliable... the point is that most of the targets wont fire back.

    You could equip it with light bombs, or against targets with no MANPADS you could use rockets and bombs, but really most of the time you would want to use it for what it was designed for... training pilots.

    You could consider it both a trainer jet and a rather well armed and fast Super Tucano if you want, but it is no MiG-21 by any measure.

    You could rip out the two engines and replace them with a single RD-33 with 9 ton thrust and get something that is supersonic... and fast accelerating and use the extra power to add weight for a new decent nose mounted radar, and extra fuel, as well as an onboard self defence avionics suite... but I am afraid your cheap little fighter will get bigger and heavier and rather more costly and also less suited to training.

    I would say starting with a good engine as a basis and then designing from scratch a simple light fast aircraft would be a better basis.... normally in design things are pretty critical... too big an engine you get an aircraft that is fast and able to manouver, but with short legs... not enough fuel and again a short legged fighter... no radar and no avionics, you have a blind sitting duck in the presence of enemy fighters...

    As I mentioned it could be used as a Super Tucano in the light strike role where there is little to no opposition, but the other option could be to use them as manned fighter drones... ie they fly with fighters... perhaps at much higher altitude and operating closer to the enemy with no radar emissions... and launch missiles at approaching enemy aircraft and once they have no more missiles they can withdraw with the larger fighters still fully armed, but they detected the targets and guided the missiles the Yaks launched, ready for an engagement fully armed.

    It would require good coordination, but the small light aircraft would be up to it... the real problem is that such small aircraft do not offer optimal launch parameters for missiles.... they can't fly that high or that fast... perhaps carrying 6 R-37Ms at 10km altitude at 800km/h, which might give them 200km range, which would still be useful enough...

    It's ideal for patrolling with recce pods saves you using up flying hours or more expensive aircraft. Of course if you want the next step up u have mig-29m2 then onto mig-35 su family etc. Currently Russia is missing the market for this category.

    I don't think there really is a lighter fighter category... a Gripen type entry, would just be a slightly smaller slightly lighter and slightly less capable MiG-35... I would say keep two engines and go for the MiG-29SMT or MiG-29M2 for reduced price fighter that would be effective in most situations and has the upgrade potential to be actually rather capable.

    In fact having 30-50 MiG-29M2s... buy a new targeting pod like Sapsan... perhaps 10 of them and fit those ten aircraft with a new AESA radar so it can operate as a more expensive but also more capable leader... buying a carrier based AWACS platform would also benefit most small airforces as it provides better command and control with a better view...

    And as Gary says if you wanted to deliver a huge payload for cheap an IL-76, An-12, An-22 kitted out with svp systems etc you now h avec a hideous amount of cheap bombs in the air with a 3-5m accuracy. Imagine what a An-22 could do with that system. You could even put it on lighter aircraft such as An-24/26, An-32, An-74 if you really wanted any cargo plane really. Would have been useful in Iraq and Syria

    You could even add a Glonass guidance system for the bombs rather cheaply and just fly a strike aircraft with radar operating to find the ground target and work out their ground coordinates and set the guidance systems on the transport planes and shove them out the back door at about the right time... no modifications needed.
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    George1

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  George1 on Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:47 am

    VKS of Russia received the next three Yak-130 aircraft

    As of October 8, 2018, three new Yak-130 combat training aircraft transferred to the Russian Aerospace Force reportedly flew from Irkutsk to the duty station. The aircraft built by the Irkutsk Aviation Plant (IAZ) of Irkut Corporation PJSC have red side numbers "37" and, presumably, "38" and "39" (estimated serial numbers are 1415, 1416 and 1417).


    One of the three new Yak-130 combat training aircraft transferred by the VKS of Russia built by the Irkutsk Aviation Plant of PJSC "Irkut Corporation" (tail number "37 red") during a stopover landing in Tolmachevo (Novosibirsk), 08.10.2018 (c) Yuri Shelukhov / vk.com

    These three Yak-130 aircraft were built by IAP in 2018, and, apparently, are the latest machines of this type, manufactured under the contract for the supply of the Russian VKS until the end of 2018, 30 Yak-130 airplanes, concluded by the Russian Ministry of Defense in April 2016. The first ten Yak-130 aircraft under this contract (cars with red side numbers from "40" to "49" - serial numbers from 1308 to 1317) were transferred to the VKS in October-December 2016 and entered the training aviation base in Armavir ( Krasnodar Territory), providing training for the restored Krasnodar Higher Military Aviation School of Pilots (KVVAUL) named after AK Serov. In May-July 2017, another six Yak-130 airplanes of 2017 with red side numbers "50", "100", "01", "02", "03" and "04" were transferred to Armavir in 2017 respectively, 1319, 1320, 1318, 1401, 1402, 1403).

    However, then the transfer of the Yak-130 aircraft to the VKS of Russia was suspended from the IAP at the end of July 2017 and was resumed only in 2018, when the VKS in March 2018 received four aircraft built in 2017 with serial numbers from 1404 to 1407 (red side numbers " 05 "," 06 "," 07 "and" 08 "), and in June 2018 received four more aircraft with red side numbers" 30 "," 32 "," 33 "and" 34 "(serial numbers, respectively 1408, 1409, 1410 and 1412). Presumably, the suspension of the transfer of cars in 2017 was associated with the ongoing modifications of the aircraft of this type after two flight incidents with the Yak-130 VCS on the same day on June 21, 2017.

    In July 2018, IAZ transferred three more Yak-130 airplanes with red side numbers "31", "35" and "36" (the estimated serial numbers, respectively, 1411, 1413 and 1414) to IAC, and now the last three cars have been handed over.

    With the transfer of these three Yak-130 aircrafts to the Russian Federation, the total number of production vehicles of this type delivered to the Russian Ministry of Defense reached 109 units - of which 12 of the first two series were built at Sokol Nizhny Novgorod Aviation Plant, and another 97 Irkutsk Aviation Plant.

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    George1

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  George1 on Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:52 am

    These planes were the last of the orders above (97+12). I think Yak-130 number in service must be 105 because 4 have been lost to accidents (if i am right)

    Labrador

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  Labrador on Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:07 pm

    George1 wrote:These planes were the last of the orders above (97+12). I think Yak-130 number in service must be 105 because 4 have been lost to accidents (if i am right)
    And about 120 L-39C
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    AMCXXL

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  AMCXXL on Tue Oct 23, 2018 4:44 am

    Labrador wrote:
    George1 wrote:These planes were the last of the orders above (97+12). I think Yak-130 number in service must be 105 because 4 have been lost to accidents (if i am right)
    And about 120 L-39C


    Yes, the number delivered are 109 and 4 lost in crashes.
    However the most of survivors of the first bath of 12 are not in service, were stored at Borisoglebsk, that have a total of 40 but in theory have only two squadrons of 16
    Recently several of these Yak-130 of first batch have been sent to Kubinka for repair and retrun to service

    About the number of L-39 in service are about 150, there are 9 squadrons of 16 each
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    miketheterrible

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  miketheterrible on Tue Oct 23, 2018 4:45 am

    Time to replace all L-39's.

    More Yak-130 are needed. Wonder why no news on more procurement?

    Labrador

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  Labrador on Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:15 pm

    AMCXXL wrote:
    However the most of survivors of the first bath of 12 are not in service, were stored at Borisoglebsk, that have a total of 40 but in theory have only two squadrons of 16
    Recently several of these Yak-130 of first batch have been sent to Kubinka for repair and retrun to service

    About the number of L-39 in service are about 150, there are 9 squadrons of 16 each


    Interesting, i have 
    - Maïkop : 63 so do 4 Sqns according to what you say
    - Mishurinsk :   "      "
    - Krasnodar : how many ? 1 Sqn the 9th ?


    Also 16 in a Yak-130 Sqn ? make sense i love this stuff and not new   Smile
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    eehnie

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  eehnie on Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:15 pm

    The L-39 requires measures for its total exhaustion. It means to maximize with the available spare parts the number of units flying, to maximize the workload of the available units flying, and to cover the needs to help Syria.

    The first consequence of it, is likely a lower workload for the units of Yak-130 and Yak-52 in the short term.

    Very likely the reduction of the fleet of trainer auxiliary aircrafts after the end of the Soviet Union has not been completed still. The reduction would be completed when all the units of all the models must work at maximum workload. A reserve of trainer auxiliary aircrafts makes not sense.  

    On trainer auxiliary aircrafts, like in other cases Russia goes toward a stable long-term production of Yak-130 and Yak-152, enough to keep the necessary active fleet, without reserve.

    At this point Russia seems not in a hurry with the production of the Yak-152, and this is a good sign. Not sure if it will be new orders of Yak-130 in the short-term. The production of Yak-130 in the short-term can continue focused in to attend the demand to export.
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    d_taddei2

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  d_taddei2 on Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:18 pm

    Although it's not always wise to fully increase the workload on old tired equipment especially aircraft. And when u have newer aircraft at your hands.
    From 5 days ago. L-39 crashes in Russia with the loss of both pilots

    https://sputniknews.com/amp/russia/201810181069004337-jet-crash-russia/

    https://sputniknews.com/amp/russia/201810201069068050-russia-plane-crash-bodies/
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    AMCXXL

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  AMCXXL on Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 pm

    Labrador wrote:
    AMCXXL wrote:
    However the most of survivors of the first bath of 12 are not in service, were stored at Borisoglebsk, that have a total of 40 but in theory have only two squadrons of 16
    Recently several of these Yak-130 of first batch have been sent to Kubinka for repair and retrun to service

    About the number of L-39 in service are about 150, there are 9 squadrons of 16 each


    Interesting, i have 
    - Maïkop : 63 so do 4 Sqns according to what you say
    - Mishurinsk :   "      "
    - Krasnodar : how many ? 1 Sqn the 9th ?


    Also 16 in a Yak-130 Sqn ? make sense i love this stuff and not new   Smile


    There are 4 training regiments with L-39 in service, with two squadorns each
    -Maikop
    -Tikhoretsk
    -Kotelnikovo
    -Michurinsk
    The njmber of airplanes in service is abput 32 in each base, the rest of L-39 are out of order

    Also there are one squadron, or at least a company of L-39 in Kuschevskaya

    miketheterrible wrote:Time to replace all L-39's.

    More Yak-130 are needed. Wonder why no news on more procurement?

    Yes, a new contract was announced for this year, probably Will be signed at the end of the year of at the begining of next


    Last edited by AMCXXL on Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:00 am; edited 1 time in total
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    eehnie

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  eehnie on Wed Oct 24, 2018 4:35 am

    d_taddei2 wrote:Although it's not always wise to fully increase the workload on old tired equipment especially aircraft.

    My comment is not about use over the limits. My previous comment means a more continuous use that leads to a faster reaching of the limits, and as consequence to a faster exhaustion and decommission of the aircrafts.

    It affects not to the safety of the flies.
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    d_taddei2

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  d_taddei2 on Wed Oct 24, 2018 10:32 am

    Your words " maximum workload " suggests to me that you work the aircraft to its maximum. To now say that you want to work q more continous use you could have said that the aircraft should be used continously to help speed up its retirement but you didn't. but maybe they don't have enough money to replace them yet and the yak -130 is a more sophisticated aircraft so I'd imagine they are using L-39 before moving onto the yak -130 but as time goes on these L-39 are getting very tired and worn and I would imagine they wouldn't want to work them continuously. If the Russians had their way I'd imagine they would retire them all tomorrow if they had enough yak-130.
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    Isos

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  Isos on Wed Oct 24, 2018 10:50 am

    What's good about yak-130 is that it is already capable of carrying nice weapons like r-73 for interception or rockets for light attack missions.

    In case of war it can be used for interception like mig-29 thanks to GCI but without a great speed which is not an issue as most of fighters don't supercruise and launch its r-73 from the back of the target. I would add a cheap OLS to maximize chances of good interception.

    This way they will have more than 100 jets helping the air force for secondary tasks while flankers and migs won't be used for that so they won't use their engines more than needed.
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    eehnie

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  eehnie on Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:00 pm

    d_taddei2 wrote:Your words " maximum workload " suggests to me that you work the aircraft to its maximum. To now say that you want to work q more continous use you could have said that the aircraft should be used continously to help speed up its retirement but you didn't.  but maybe they don't have enough money to replace them yet and the yak -130 is a more sophisticated aircraft so I'd imagine they are using L-39 before moving onto the yak -130  but as time goes on these L-39 are getting very tired and worn and I would imagine they wouldn't want to work them continuously. If the Russians had their way I'd imagine they would retire them all tomorrow if they had enough yak-130.

    The right quote is "to maximize the workload" of the aircraft. They are technical terms that never mean unsafe use. For a trainer auxiliary aircraft, taking into account the nature of its workload, that is training flies of one instructor with one trained pilot, it means to work more hours, to fly more hours, in order to make the service for more trained pilots, even with different instructors fliying with the same aircraft (is not about to maximize the workload of the instructors or the trained pilots, is about to maximize the workload of the aircraft).

    The aircraft reachs exhaustion when some parts reach its limit of flying hours and there is not spare parts to replace them.

    Read again my comment to understand it properly.

    eehnie wrote:The L-39 requires measures for its total exhaustion. It means to maximize with the available spare parts the number of units flying, to maximize the workload of the available units flying, and to cover the needs to help Syria.

    The first consequence of it, is likely a lower workload for the units of Yak-130 and Yak-52 in the short term.

    Very likely the reduction of the fleet of trainer auxiliary aircrafts after the end of the Soviet Union has not been completed still. The reduction would be completed when all the units of all the models must work at maximum workload. A reserve of trainer auxiliary aircrafts makes not sense.  

    On trainer auxiliary aircrafts, like in other cases Russia goes toward a stable long-term production of Yak-130 and Yak-152, enough to keep the necessary active fleet, without reserve.

    At this point Russia seems not in a hurry with the production of the Yak-152, and this is a good sign. Not sure if it will be new orders of Yak-130 in the short-term. The production of Yak-130 in the short-term can continue focused in to attend the demand to export.

    In fact this is what Russia is doing since some time. Your comment about lack of money is not right. The use of the Russian L-39 is not unsafe, simply Russia wants to exhaust them before, attending also the Syrian needs, while reserving units of other models for use later.

    If you read the initial comments of this topic, you will see how the initial preview of the needs of Yak-130 was around 120 aircrafts. Russia is very near this number. I do not rule out a new order of Yak-130, but I do not expect too much. I expect Russia finds long term stable production for their new trainer auxiliary aircrafts in order to keep the active fleet without reserve. It is the right thing to do.

    .

    Labrador

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    Re: Yak-130: News

    Post  Labrador on Wed Oct 24, 2018 1:52 pm

    AMCXXL wrote:
    Labrador wrote:
    AMCXXL wrote:
    However the most of survivors of the first bath of 12 are not in service, were stored at Borisoglebsk, that have a total of 40 but in theory have only two squadrons of 16
    Recently several of these Yak-130 of first batch have been sent to Kubinka for repair and retrun to service

    About the number of L-39 in service are about 150, there are 9 squadrons of 16 each


    Interesting, i have 
    - Maïkop : 63 so do 4 Sqns according to what you say
    - Mishurinsk :   "      "
    - Krasnodar : how many ? 1 Sqn the 9th ?


    Also 16 in a Yak-130 Sqn ? make sense i love this stuff and not new   Smile


    There are 4 training regiments with L-39 in service, with two squadorns each
    -Maikop
    -Tikhoretsk
    -Kotelnikovo
    -Michurinsk
    The njmber of airplanes in service is abput 32 in each base, the rest of L-39 are out of order

    Also there are one squadron, or at least a company of L-39 in Kuschevskaya

    Thank you !  Cool

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