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    UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

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    Flanky
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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Mon Sep 12, 2011 10:48 am

    While that being said might be true, it might be that as with the UAVs that they might be a bit late to come up with their own designs.
    But back to the topic.
    I would like to see the Lutch UAV with weapons.
    Any pics?

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Mon Sep 12, 2011 12:33 pm

    I don't have any but I do remember having some pics/drawings of other Russian UCAVs...

    The DANEM:





    This version of Dozor seems to have under wing pods, so underwing pylons for light weapons should not be a huge step:






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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:44 pm

    Ah sorry i forgot the translation for the submarine picture you have provided:

    Televizionno optichesky kompleks (optical monitoring system) - under the frontal part of the submarine where the group of search lights are facing the ground
    Manipuljatorny kompleks (manipulation system) - next to the tv system further back under the sub
    Opori dlja postanovky na grunt (ground landing legs) - under the sub right behind the manipulation system
    next is the "kombinirovanij rabocik blok dla provedennij podvodnogo-technologiceskich i gruzopodemnich rabot" - special combined underwater handling system
    then again - "Opori dlja postanovky na grunt"
    next at the end of the sub is: "Vint fiksirovanogo saga" - which is the propeller
    then at the upper part of the sub moving from the back to the front are "podrulivajushie ustroistva" - which are basically the little maneuvering propellers.
    then at the side of the sub is "GAS bokovogo obzora" which is either side window or side looking sonar
    and in the front is "GAS krugovogo i sektornogo obzora" which is again i strongly believe is circular sonar and focused beam sonar.

    And those little two UUVs are the first one in the left:

    Neobitajemij podvodnij apparat s manipuljatornim kompleksom - remote underwater system with handling complex (robotic amrs)

    And the smaller one is:

    Malogabaritnij osmotrovij neobitaemij podvodnij apparat - small remote reconaissance system


    (correct me somebody if you do know russian better than me)







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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue Sep 13, 2011 7:36 am

    Thanks.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Tue Sep 27, 2011 5:05 am

    Just saw a news report about a Russian UAV that has crashed in Ingushetia and I led me to start thinking.

    There are a few very expensive items in a UAV, like the optics and datalink and perhaps even the engine and the though occured to me that if you designed you UAVs to have a fine wire or cable attaching all the expensive bits together with a loop outside the aircraft that you could design a UAV helo that could be sent out with a hook or grabber that could recover the expensive parts of your UAV.

    Obviously in Ingushetia it is part of Russia so there is no real problem, but when operating in remote areas, or perhaps in areas you don't want others to know you are operating in this might be useful.

    You could have these helo based UAVs ready to fly the instant you lost contact with your UAV and you could have some sort of electronic beacon in the UAV to make them easier to find, though you might want to design it so that it only emits a signal when it detects a command signal to start transmitting, and that command signal could be given by the UAV looking for it when it arrives in the vicinity of where it went missing.

    The helo based UAV could be developed further as it could be used to deliver weapons or ammo or food or fuel or all of these to remote bases or units on patrol or half way through a mission.

    There is talk of a UAV based on the Mi-34 helo which should offer the potential for UAV med evac or unit recovery... or fit it with MGs and rockets and use it as direct fire support.

    BTW news report here: http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20110926/167145807.html

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Cyberspec on Tue Sep 27, 2011 3:35 pm

    worthwhile idea I guess

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:49 pm

    GarryB wrote:Just saw a news report about a Russian UAV that has crashed in Ingushetia and I led me to start thinking.

    There are a few very expensive items in a UAV, like the optics and datalink and perhaps even the engine and the though occured to me that if you designed you UAVs to have a fine wire or cable attaching all the expensive bits together with a loop outside the aircraft that you could design a UAV helo that could be sent out with a hook or grabber that could recover the expensive parts of your UAV.
    The problem is you cannot have all the pieces connected together in a crashed state and those precious pieces to be still usefull.
    Most of the things are expensive not because of the materials but because of the work.
    Depending on the crash some parts might be still ok and reusable.

    Obviously in Ingushetia it is part of Russia so there is no real problem, but when operating in remote areas, or perhaps in areas you don't want others to know you are operating in this might be useful.
    You would make these UAVs even more expensive. I think it is possible to design systems that would surive crash. But they are robust like a blackbox is, generally heavy and would have very poor signal transmission/reception capabilities. Meaning that the search vehicle would have to be relatively close to the not expected but actual crash site - which may differ very much in case a HALE UAV is lost on a long range mission.

    You could have these helo based UAVs ready to fly the instant you lost contact with your UAV and you could have some sort of electronic beacon in the UAV to make them easier to find, though you might want to design it so that it only emits a signal when it detects a command signal to start transmitting, and that command signal could be given by the UAV looking for it when it arrives in the vicinity of where it went missing.
    It is possible as stated, but you will have to use a blackbox like technology which is heavy. And the electronics in it would have to be assembled not in a common fashion like in a printed circuit board, but a special kind of technology would have to be used to embedd the components into a solid body. So that they will not break after the crash ground shock.


    The helo based UAV could be developed further as it could be used to deliver weapons or ammo or food or fuel or all of these to remote bases or units on patrol or half way through a mission.

    There is talk of a UAV based on the Mi-34 helo which should offer the potential for UAV med evac or unit recovery... or fit it with MGs and rockets and use it as direct fire support.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Sep 28, 2011 3:48 am

    The problem is you cannot have all the pieces connected together in a crashed state and those precious pieces to be still usefull.
    Most of the things are expensive not because of the materials but because of the work.
    Depending on the crash some parts might be still ok and reusable.

    Light cable or even fishing line type material could be used to connect all the major components together.

    Obviously if the UAV was shot down by a BUK with 70kgs of HE in its warhead then there probably will not be that much left worth recovering.

    I was thinking primarily in terms of crashed UAVs, and as long as there is no fire after the crash I think a bit of cable connecting the wings to the body and the tail parts to the body and the cameras and engine to the body, plus of course if it has a long body a few cables down the length of the vehicle to ensure the body stays in one piece.

    If you lose a wing or both and the tail that would be OK as long as you can recover the thermal camera and any radar or sensor equipment and the engine I would think that would be much better than nothing. Of course really secret stuff might have a HE charge to prevent it falling into the wrong hands. On a more positive side being able to recover a black box might help determine what went wrong which might save a lot of other UAVs from the same fate.

    You would make these UAVs even more expensive.

    Beacons are not expensive, and a beacon that doesn't transmit till it detects a particular signal is not that complex or expensive... very often the crashed UAV would never be found anyway in some locations. Even here in NZ some trampers found the remains of a light aircraft that had crashed 20 years ago a while back, and a cessna is much bigger than most UAVs.

    I think it is possible to design systems that would surive crash. But they are robust like a blackbox is, generally heavy and would have very poor signal transmission/reception capabilities. Meaning that the search vehicle would have to be relatively close to the not expected but actual crash site - which may differ very much in case a HALE UAV is lost on a long range mission.

    Most UAVs have satellite communication systems so they will already have plenty of powerful antennas. I was not really thinking in terms of HALE or MALE type UAVs due to the fact that they could be rather too heavy to recover by a little helo. I would think the increased cost might warrant a larger scale rescue mission, or conversely a bombing mission to deal with the wreckage to prevent its capture etc.

    It is possible as stated, but you will have to use a blackbox like technology which is heavy. And the electronics in it would have to be assembled not in a common fashion like in a printed circuit board, but a special kind of technology would have to be used to embedd the components into a solid body. So that they will not break after the crash ground shock.

    The ZMP-K-01 protected memory modules are rated to withstand impact loads of 3,400 gravities, and withstand 100% coverage of flame at 1,100 degrees C for 60 minutes and temperatures of 260 degrees C for 10 hours and weighs less than 3kgs.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Tue Dec 13, 2011 8:46 pm

    I guess allmost everybody have heard the news about Iranians taking control of an RQ-170 and bringing it down safe and sound.
    Chinese and Russians are keen to inspect the plane.
    IMHO both Russians and Chinese will get access to intelligence gathered by the iranians about the drone, but who will actually get the drone...
    There are speculations that the drone had been brought down with the assistance of a Russian Kvant 1L222 Avtobaza mobile ground ELINT station.
    So theoretically Russians helped to bring it down, they should have the upper bid - i know that Iranians were quite mad when Russians refused to sell them the S-300, but considering how the US is basically ignoring all the Russian warning with its missile shield in europe - Russians might also secretly ignore the embargo and send the S-300 to iran for their lovely trophy being the RQ-170. If Russians would get their hands on the beast of kandahar, it would undoubtedly booost their HALE program.

    I can't wait to see how which direction this turn of events will take.
    Chinese to the contrary already have their UAV programs quite advanced, so they are not in such a need but, on the other hand China is known to be more friendly to Iran in the matter of selling their HQ-9 (S300 copy) to Iran. Chinese also could probably pay more money for the drone.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Dec 14, 2011 1:21 am

    I rather suspect that this was a planned operation and as part of the planning I would think the whole point of taking control and landing it intact was for intel purposes.

    I would like to see this operation lead to Iran getting S-300 missiles from Russia as their presence there would likely act as a significant deterrence to a US or Israeli attack.

    I think this would also be in the interests of Israel and the US as an attack on Iran will not solve their problems and only make things worse.

    If I was in Iranian shoes an attack on nuclear facilities would lead to an immediate direct response and the creation of a real nuclear weapon program... because they wouldn't try that sht with a real nuclear power.

    I would suspect that this drone is not fitted with the best of the best as being a drone it is ultimately expendible.

    For all we know it could be a trojan horse.

    I am sure they were very careful.

    I am sure they will learn a lot from this drone, but I rather doubt we will see a Russian clone.

    With the Sidewinder missile the situation was quite different... they captured a missile intact and found it had a completely modular design that was far more simple than the complex existing Russian designs. The design was so simple and straight forward and so different from what the Soviets were doing it was decided it would be simpler to basically copy the Sidewinder design, but with Soviet components, than it was to wait 5 years while the missile design bureaus absorbed the new concept of modular design to simplify production and maintainence.

    With a sidewinder if there is a problem with the seeker, just pop off the seeker section and fit a new one. With an AA-1 Alkali you discard the missile and build a whole new one.

    It also means upgrading is easier as a new rocket motor can be made to fit the standardised other parts, so remove the old motor and fit the new one.

    All very simple and obvious now, but brand new and revolutionary for the Soviets.

    They actually took that modularity a step further in the R-27 family with a range of different motors and seeker options etc.

    This new drone might help them with material and shaping choices, and I am sure that the datalink and optics and radar technology will be of interest. I am pretty sure they will also be interested in the engine too.

    The wont carbon copy the drone... except possibly to give to Iran to patrol its borders armed with Iglas.... wouldn't that be ironic... Smile

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Wed Dec 14, 2011 7:06 pm

    Well at this stage i have no doubt that Russians had many HALE subsystems already worked out.
    However what the Sentinel can bring to them are the miniaturization of its electronic subsystems, the operating system - probably military grade linux from windriver.
    Communications datalink - a satelite uplink or that kind, datalink encryption (but since they have hacked it - they had figured out that one), fail safe systems (but then again since they have brought it down safely they had figured that probably as well), optics are one of the things that could make a differrence and engine... engine inspection might greatly help to eother develop a new design or significantly improve existing ones.
    It might not look like this way, but this can significantly contribute to Russian HALE program. But in a same fashion than you i really dought we will see a Russian copy.
    They will most probably take some revolutionary design which will not be a simple flying wing.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:55 am

    Copies are actually a lot of hard work to produce something the enemy is already familiar with.

    Emergency use only.

    I am sure the night vision and day vision optics will be of interest as this drone operates at high altitude. Also stabilisation systems (hardware and software) for those optics will likely be of interest.
    The datalink setup, plus of course the engine design will also be of interest too and the materials the drone is made out of will likely be of interest too.

    High flying would require significant weight economy in the design while retaining stealthy shapes and materials.

    I rather think they will take the solutions that are useful to them and apply them to existing models they are working on, but there will not likely be any copying as such.

    On another note... perhaps Pakistan should approach Russia to buy a few of these vehicles too. A few CIA drones to take apart should help the Pakistani Drone development programme too. Smile

    Apart from the modularity of design the Soviets learned that their IR seekers were better than the one used in the captured American missile, and that their rocket motors were more powerful, but the thing that surprised them was the fin tip gyros that stabilised the missile in flight. The Soviet missiles had internal gyros that needed mechanical winding up and took up a bit of space inside the missile. The gyros on the Sidewinder were external and spun up by the air flowing past the missile and therefore took up no internal space and did not use internal power and were much smaller... it was about the only US component they copied, though I think the American servo motors for the control surfaces were smaller and were copied too.

    BTW the Russians already make operating systems of their own, and miniturisation is not an issue now that they can source electronic components from foreign countries.

    They are currently working on a domestic multicore CPU for military purposes too.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Thu Dec 15, 2011 12:41 pm

    Maybe Pakistan will be inspired by Iranian success... who knows.


    I rather think they will take the solutions that are useful to them and apply them to existing models they are working on
    Definitelly - they are not Chineese.
    Chineese are known to copy the systems nearly to scratch.


    BTW the Russians already make operating systems of their own, and miniturisation is not an issue now that they can source electronic components from foreign countries.
    They are currently working on a domestic multicore CPU for military purposes too.
    Well the Russians are very carefull when designing their subsystems in choosing a foreign company as subcontractor to supply electronic components. The reason for this is that the company (Texas Instruments is very popular in Russia) like TI might design a component with the exact properties as Russians would want but additionally with a hardware "backdoor" - meaning software layer is completelly out of the circle, and in case of mission critical systems like Radars, like missile seekers, Command and Control network structure and so on - you don't want to have a "hole" in the system such as a backdoor be it software or hardware would normally meant. This is why they are bit by bit driving away from the concept of buying foreign electronic parts for their military systems and even systems of national importance - they are not all military but could be for example meteorologic, economic, climate monitoring, space systems, catastrophy management and so on.
    So its a bit outdated view and they are trying to produce everything themselves although we all know its not allways possible and some components still needs to be bough abroad. But as years come and go this is a retreating trend. One thing they are still very dependend on is the abroad production of their processors - they do design them themselves, but they have to manufacture them abroad. I believe they should have atleast 2 45-32 nano metre production facilities in Russia one located maybe in the european part of the country and one deeply in Siberia for strategic reasons.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Dec 15, 2011 2:54 pm

    I agree, and they should make their CPUs commercially available too, I am sure there would be plenty of nutters like myself that don't trust the US/West and would like Russian hardware in their computer setups.

    Obviously however even hardware backdoors require some form of direct connection to access, you could design an array of barriers and obstacles between electronics and external access to prevent the activation of backdoors.

    Of course the ideal is to not have them there in the first place... Syria was vulnerable because it had French experts helping it with its Air Defence Network, who clearly shared information with Israel.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Flanky on Thu Dec 15, 2011 6:23 pm

    Well the networking industry is allmost a as a closed vip club where only certain companies got an invitation. But this is changing as well.
    http://pkcc.ru/en - is a promising company to manufacture networking hardware.
    There are others that want to catch up the trend.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Dec 16, 2011 1:35 am

    Thanks for the link.... will have a look. Smile

    I think their best bet in many markets will be to emphasise the fact that they are not an American company and as such are not obliged to put spyware in their products to help the FBI and CIA spy on you.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Thu Jan 19, 2012 5:53 am


    Russia Allocates $160 Mln for Drone Development

    Guarding the borders: Russia tests new drone

    Russian Helicopters has received 5 billion rubles ($160 mln) from the federal budget for the development of three types of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).

    After charging that smaller domestic developers wasted public funds - and pointedly purchasing Israeli drones for military trials - the Defense Ministry has switched to a big holding with sufficient capacity to develop and produce indigenous UAVs.

    According to the Gazeta.ru portal, the company has been contracted by the Russian Defense Ministry to develop light-, medium-, and heavy-weight rotary UAVs for reconnaissance, strike and transportation purposes.

    A prototype of a short-range drone, Ka-135, with carrying capacity of up to 100 kg, must be developed by 2015.

    A heavy-weight UAV, dubbed Albatros, is expected to be developed by 2017. It can be used as a strike or transport drone.

    The most recent contract envisions the development of a medium-weight UAV with operational range of up to 300 km.

    If successful, Russian Helicopters may receive additional funding in the future to develop two more types of UAVs to be delivered to the military and police.


    I have seen a few UAV prototypes from Kamov that include a large simple ball with coaxial main rotorblades called Ka-137.

    Its performance figures are pretty good with a payload of up to 80kgs, though 50kgs is normal and with a normal payload it can operate to a range of 530km.
    4hour flight time and speeds of 145km/h cruising and 175km/h max for a UAV with a takeoff weight of 280kgs is pretty good.
    It can hover in free flight a 2,900m and fly to a ceiling of 5,000m.

    I seem to remember the Ka-135 as being helicopter shaped with coaxial main rotors and a bit larger.

    To deliver equipment or food and water and ammo to separate units, as well as light strike roles, UAV helicopters would be ideal.

    A large UAV helo... say an unmanned helo the size of an Mi-34C1 could even be used for emergency personel evac... fly it in with weapons and rapidly use those weapons on any nearby enemy forces and then land to pick up casualties or personel requiring evac or to deliver specialist equipment like laser target markers for an artillery/air strike.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  George1 on Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:09 pm

    What about Dozor ? it looks like American predator uav

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:55 am

    There are plenty of branches of the Russian military and paramilitary forces, and each will want their own systems... the Army, the Air Force, the Navy, the FSB, Border patrol, space and air defence forces etc etc.

    Even within the Air Force there is long range aviation, frontal aviation, etc etc.

    Each will want very specific designs for very specific roles.

    For instance in the Army very long range wont be important but long endurance over the battlefield will be important. Speed wont be important, but being quiet will be critical to its effectiveness.

    For the Navy very long range, very long endurance, all weather capability are important things.

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Austin on Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:13 am

    Russia launches MALE-class UAV Project

    Denis Fedutinov

    Moscow Defense Brief

    In the autumn of 2011 the Russian MoD announced R&D contracts for two relatively heavy unmanned aerial vehicles, with an approximate take-off weight 800kg and 4,500 kg.

    Recognizing the need

    The United States is the world leader in MALE-class (Medium Altitude, High Endurance) UAVs. It has been developing the Predator family of drones since the early 1990s. Early models saw their first action during the war in Yugoslavia, which highlighted the practical uses of the UAVs of that class, and stimulated further research and development. The second war in Iraq and the campaign in Afghanistan saw routine and wide-spread use of the Predator and Reaper drones. In addition to providing continuous aerial reconnaissance and target tracking, they have been used to launch missiles against targets on the ground, killing a number of key Al Qaeda operatives.

    Russia has several obvious uses for MALE-class UAVs; many of them have to do with the sheer size of the country’s territory. The prospective users include the armed forces and several other uniformed agencies, especially the Border Service and the Coastguard.

    Import or indigenous design?

    The world’s most capable armed forces either operate MALE-class drones already or are studying how best to acquire them. Some countries pursue indigenous projects (sometimes in cooperation with foreign partners); others buy their UAVs abroad; several nations do both.

    Apart from the United States, only Israel now makes its own MALE-class drones. The Israeli product range includes the Heron and Eitan (Heron TP) systems made by Israel Aerospace Industries. A recent addition to the Israeli product range is the Heron 900, made by Elbit systems. Italy buys Predators from the United States. Germany and France operate specially adapted Heron models. The UAE, India, South Africa, China and several other countries are developing MALE-class UAVs, either independently or in cooperation with foreign partners such as Britain and France.

    Russia has long pursued a policy of developing and manufacturing all its weapons on its own. In recent years, however, it has come to realize that such an approach is no longer viable. Russian defense technology is increasingly lagging behind the foreign competition in a number of key areas. In addition, the Russian defense industry is often unable to deliver the new weapons ordered by the armed forces quickly enough or in sufficient volume. UAVs is one area where the technological gap has become especially obvious. To address the situation, in 2009 the Russian MoD placed an order for a batch of Israeli drones, including the Bird Eye 400 (mini-class) and the Searcher MkII (tactical class, which is closer to MALE). The drones were delivered in 2010, and the training of their operators was completed in 2011.

    But the Russian army still doesn’t have any MALE-class drones. Buying them from the United States is out of the question owing to American export restrictions, and Israel has refused to sell, reportedly after coming under American pressure.

    Contracts


    The Russian MoD has announced contracts for two UAV R&D projects. The first contract, worth about 2bn roubles, is for the smaller of the two drones; the winner must deliver a product ready for mass production.

    The second contract, worth about 1bn roubles, is for the larger of the two drones; it is expected to deliver a working prototype.

    The winners and losers

    Several Russian companies submitted their bids. Three companies were in the running for the contract to build the smaller UAV: Tupolev, which is part of the United Aircraft Corporation (OAK); Luch Design Bureau, a Rybinsk-based branch of the Vega concern; and the Tranzas company from St. Petersburg.

    Luch Design Bureau is the only company which already had an existing prototype when it submitted the bid. The vehicle, also called Luch, is based on Sigma-5, a small trainer aircraft for rookie pilots designed by the Sigma-TS company from Zhukovo, Moscow Region. Experts believe, however, that using a piloted aircraft as a UAV platform is not the best solution, even though this has already been tried in other countries. To make matters worse for Luch, its parent company, the Vega concern, it not held in very high regard in the MoD. Some time ago Vega was designated as Russia’s main developer of UAVs, but failed to live up to the generals’ expectations. Its designs have repeatedly come under criticism from Vladimir Popovkin, a former first deputy defense minister. One of the Vega products, the Tipchak tactical UAV, turned out to be a big disappointment during the 2008 conflict in Georgia, especially when measured against Israeli-made drones used by the Georgians.

    Another bidder for the first UAV contract, Tupolev, is one of the founders of the Russian school of UAV design. Its first drones date back to the 1950s, but most of the Tupolev designs are extremely dated. The company is also struggling financially. In the absence of large new orders Tupolev’s R&D capability has seen a rapid deterioration. It is also finding it difficult to attract and retain the design and engineering expertise.

    The contract for the smaller UAV has therefore been awarded to Tranzas. Its high-tech designs, well-known both in Russia and abroad, focus mainly on simulator systems. It also has experience in developing tactical UAVs.

    The second MoD contract, for the larger of th]e two UAVs, attracted two bidders: Sokol Design Bureau (Kazan), and RSK MiG.

    MiG has developed dozens of combat aircraft over the decades, most of them fighters and interceptors. It also has some experience in designing UAVs, although most of those designs date back to the past century. Its most recent UAV design, the Skat attack drone, was demonstrated at the MAKS-2007 airshow, but it appears that the project has never been completed.

    For these reasons the MoD awarded the second contract to Sokol. The company is one of Russia’s leading developers and suppliers of aerial targets. It also has several active drone projects. In addition to its prior experience with UAVs, one of Sokol’s main advantages is that the company is relatively compact, which makes it a more nimble and effective operator in the new post-Soviet economic environment. The company also has its own manufacturing facilities.

    Outlook

    The winners, Tranzas and Sokol, have announced that they are going to work on the two projects together. Sokol will probably focus on designing the airframe and on the subsequent mass production, while Tranzas will integrate the avionics and design the ground control stations for the two UAVs. Both projects will be led by Nikolay Dolzhenkov, a prominent Russian aircraft designer. He was the lead designer of the Pchela UAV, which is used in the Stroy-P, a regiment-level tactical aerial reconnaissance system. His other designs include the Yak-130 combat trainer.

    It is not yet clear which design and engineering solutions will be used in the two UAVs. Some information will probably appear in the run-up to the MAKS-2013 airshow. It has been reported that both UAVs are expected to take to the air in 2014 and enter a flight test program in 2015.

    Conclusion

    Russia’s decision to design MALE-class UAVs independently has its upsides and downsides. On the one hand, the project will be expensive. It is for a good reason that several European countries have decided to pool their efforts in this area. On the other hand, independent projects provide for greater flexibility and impose fewer restrictions on any subsequent exports. Rosoboronexport already has a lot of foreign customers. Integrating UAVs into the existing Russian reconnaissance and weapons systems would make them significantly more attractive for international buyers.

    Russian Patriot
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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Russian Patriot on Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:14 pm

    Russia's Defense Ministry Wants Strike Drone

    RIA Novosti

    12:17 02/04/2012 MOSCOW, April 2 (RIA Novosti) - Russia’s Defense Ministry has issued a technical specification for development of a strike unmanned air vehicle (UAV), Izvestia daily said on Monday quoting a high-level source.

    Tranzas company will build the UAV's on-board electronics as well as its navigation and control systems. The airframe, which will weigh about five tons, will be produced by the Kazan-based Sokol design bureau.

    The new aircraft will have a modular structure, the source said, and will be able to carry various types of equipment and armament.

    Russia’s Defense Ministry sealed contracts worth an estimated 3 billion rubles ($101.9 million) with Tranzas and Sokol in October 2011 for research work into creation of strike and reconnaissance UAVs.

    In late March, Russian Air Force commander-in-chief Col. Gen. Alexander Zelin, told Moscovsky Komsomolets tabloid that strike drones will enter service before 2020. He did not specify how many drones will be acquired.

    The United States has relied heavily on UAVs including the Predator system to carry out missile attacks on insurgents in the Afghanistan-Pakistan border area.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/news/russia/2012/russia-120402-rianovosti01.htm

    So , they finally are starting this critical area of development, whether its Male class , I don't know but based on the company, that prediction has some merit

    TheArmenian
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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  TheArmenian on Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:11 pm

    Some UAV news for today:

    1) Presentation at ENICS :
    Video: http://prav.tatarstan.ru/rus/pressa/1video.htm/video/401164.htm
    Photos: http://prav.tatarstan.ru/rus/pressa/photo.htm/photoreport/401164.htm

    2) New Orlan-10 (Sea-Eagle-10) to be tested for Reconaissance/Scouting
    http://izvestia.ru/news/522006
    http://www.vz.ru/news/2012/4/17/574738.html

    Quick points:
    Already tested in Akhtubinsk range. Will be tested in Alabino range.
    Already in service with some services. Very pleased.
    Controlled range: 125 km
    Maximum ferry range: 1000 km (acts autonomously at long ranges)
    Endurance: 10 hours
    Equipment: Cameras, high-rez videos, thermal imaging, relay/communication systems etc.
    Control vehicle: UAZ-like SUVs that can control up to 4 UAVS.

    By the way, the Orlan-10 is made by "Special Technology Centre"
    http://bla-orlan.ru/index.php/english/orlan-10.html


    Last edited by TheArmenian on Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:16 pm; edited 1 time in total

    victor7
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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  victor7 on Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:14 pm

    Unmanned Vehicles area is something where Russia needs to do some serious catching up. 2020 is like 8 years and US already has UCAVs on the go.

    GarryB
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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  GarryB on Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:11 am

    Unmanned Vehicles area is something where Russia needs to do some serious catching up. 2020 is like 8 years and US already has UCAVs on the go.

    Lets not exaggerate.

    The US needs UAVs to manage it global empire.

    Russia doesn't need to murder people in Pakistan or Yemen... and if it did it would likely use cruise missiles or planes... or FSB teams to do it.

    Russia is a huge country and will find UAVs and UCAVs cheaper and more flexible than manned aircraft to cover that area more efficiently.

    Thanks for that info TheArmenian... already voted today so I will vote for your post tomorrow... Smile

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    Re: UAVs in Russian Armed Forces: News

    Post  Sujoy on Mon Jun 04, 2012 7:05 pm

    Russia to buy Israeli UAVs

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