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    Pakistan Navy: News

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    Vladimir79
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    Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  Vladimir79 on Mon Aug 03, 2009 12:35 pm

    Pakistan has received a new frigate from China
    03.08.2009

    China delivered 30 July, the customer first antisubmarine frigate type of F-22P (Zulfiqar), built at a shipyard in Shanghai for the Navy of Pakistan. This, according to Agence France-Presse, said an official of the Pakistani Defense Minister Lieutenant-Commander Shakeel Ahmed (Shakeel Ahmed).

    Under the contract, which was the manufacturer and the customer in 2005, the ship will be equipped with antisubmarine helicopters, missiles surface-to-air and surface-to-surface missiles and other weapons. According to Ahmed, the new frigate will not only strengthen the military potential of countries of the Navy, but also improve the ability of the shipbuilding industry.

    Note that all the Pakistani Navy ship to receive four types of F-22P. Three of them will be constructed in China, and the last - in the shipyard in Karachi in Pakistan. The agreement between the two countries also provides for the transfer of technology and production is estimated at 750 million dollars.

    Displacement-type frigate F-22P is about 2500 tons, length - 111,7 m, speed - 29 knots. As an antisubmarine helicopters to be used by machines Harbin Z-9, a licensed version of the European Eurocopter Dauphin.
    31.07.2009

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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  lulldapull on Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:31 am

    With the advent of the Yakhont inspired 'Brahmos' in the Indian Navy, now anything that floats in the Arabian sea is doomed to sink to the bottom.

    Whatever China and the U.S. give to this Pakistan, Russia neutralizes it with its weapon deliveries to India.

    Pretty soon the IN's Il-38's and the Tu-142MZ's will also be able to carry and fire these Brahmos missiles, effectively forcing the Pakistan navy permanently into its port at Karachi.
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    Pakistan Navy Inducts Advanced Chinese Anti-Submarine Helicopters

    Post  milky_candy_sugar on Tue Nov 09, 2010 11:51 am

    Nov. 09 (China Military News cited from pak1stanfirst.com) -- The second batch of four Z9EC Anti Submarine helicopters, and the first Information and Electronic Warfare Jet aircraft were formally inducted in [1] pakistan Navy Aviation fleet on Thursday.

    The induction ceremony was held at PN Aviation Base PNS Mehran. Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral, Noman Bashir was the chief guest.

    The Z9EC helicopters have been acquired from China under the contract with China National Aero technology Import and Export Corporation (CATIC). The first batch was inducted last year which has been successfully taking part in Naval Air Operations. These helicopters operate from F-22P Frigates which now make an important part of PN Fleet. The helicopters are equipped with advanced sensors and torpedoes for undertaking designed role of Anti Submarine Warfare.


    The acquisition of IW/EW jet aircraft would add a new dimension to [1] pakistan Navy’s intelligence gathering capabilities. The aircraft, equipped with modern and sophisticated equipment, is capable of covering larger areas in short time span, and would significantly enhance maritime domain awareness of own area of operations.

    Speaking on the occasion, Chief of the Naval Staff said that while the Indian Ocean holds maximum stakes in terms of vital resources and strategically important sea lines of communication, It has also witnessed rise in maritime crimes, posing challenges to regional and extra regional players. Considering the threat in the shape of trans-national terrorist networks, security is no longer an isolated affair and navies are today resorting to the concept of ‘collaborative and collective security’. He said that [1] pakistan Navy is also playing an important role in these collaborative efforts towards peace and security. Induction of new platforms would provide PN with the means to meet these challenges more efficiently and effectively.

    Admiral Bashir further said that [1] pakistan enjoys time-tested, multi dimensional and deep rooted relations with China. These relations have grown deeper and stronger in all spheres of defence and economic cooperation. F-22P and Z9EC projects are clear manifestations of these bonds of friendship.

    Earlier in his welcome address, Commander [1] pakistan Fleet Vice Admiral Tanveer Faiz gave an account of acquisition programme of these aircraft and their role in PN Aviation Fleet.

    The ceremony concluded with an impressive fly past of newly acquired Z9EC helicopters. Among others, the ceremony was also attended by Mr. Liu Jian, Ambassador of China, Mr. Yang Ying, Vice President M/s CATIC, senior naval officers and aviators of [1] pakistan Navy.



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    Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  max steel on Sun Jan 17, 2016 11:04 am

    Pakistani Naval Modernization Appears Stalled

    Pakistan's naval modernization program appears stalled, with no discernible progress being made on efforts to modernize and expand the surface and sub-surface fleet. This comes amid moves ensure the security of the deepwater port of Gwadar, and fears of mass obsolescence vis-a-vis arch rival India.

    Gwadar is the start of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) to link western China to the Middle East and Africa through Pakistan. It will carry commercial goods and energy resources, slashing the time to ship goods to China via the Malacca Straits and South China Sea.

    For Pakistan, ensuring maritime security has been of increased concern. Earlier this month, a newly raised battalion of Marines began protecting Gwadar. Author, analyst, and former Australian defense attache to Islamabad Brian Cloughley says this was probably through extra enlistments due to the Marines "already being stretched in commitments."

    Ensuring Gwadar's defense has been the theme of recent exercises. A domestic series of drills, Seapark, was held in November and December.

    A series of recent bilateral exercises with China's Navy have also been held, the third of which concluded on Tuesday off the Pakistani coast.

    It aimed to protect sea lines of communication and the CPEC by improving coordination and interoperability at operational and tactical levels. Chinese ships consisted of two Type-054A frigates (Liuzhou and Sanya) and a replenishment ship (Qinghaihu).

    Pakistan participated with warships, helicopters, patrol and fighter aircraft, plus special forces. Air defense, boarding, communication, and joint maneuver drills were carried out.

    However, the need to ensure seaward defense of Gwadar has exposed the apparent lack of progress in the Navy's modernization program. The frontline fleet currently consists of three Agosta-90B/Khalid and two Agosta-70 submarines, plus four F-22P/Zulfiquar, one Oliver Hazard Perry, and five ex-British Type-21/Amazon class frigates.

    Pakistan has negotiated the purchase of eight AIP-equipped submarines from China, finalizing the deal in October. This was reportedly followed by a domestic frigate and fast attack boat-building program with Chinese assistance.

    This latter program was also to include upgrades to the current F-22P class frigates, Pakistan's most modern and capable surface ships even though they are only marginally better than the remaining frigates in being able to protect themselves from missile attack.

    Cloughley believes time is running out.

    "It seems that the emphasis for the moment is on developing the submarine arm of the Navy, but it is essential for Pakistan's security that it acquire more surface ships, and that a decision on number and type be made this year."

    Nothing has as of yet been signed however and despite request for clarification by Defense News there has been no official word on any progress or the programs' status.

    This pales in comparison to India, which is fast modernizing and expanding its naval power.

    Sam Bateman, an adviser for the Maritime Security Programme at S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore, said, "Pakistan has already fallen far behind India in terms of maintaining a level of conventional deterrent/operational effectiveness, and is at risk of falling even further behind."

    Bateman, who previously served in Australia's Navy outlines a course of action similar to the stalled modernization program.

    "In broad terms, the [Pakistan Navy] has three requirements: frigates, submarines and fast attack craft," he said.

    "Looking at its current force structure, my priority for force development would be submarines," he said. "The existing submarine fleet is far short of being an adequate or credible deterrent force. The deterrent value of submarines, as well as their utility for covert surveillance and intelligence collection operations, points to the importance of the [Pakistan Navy] building a credible force."

    Therefore Pakistan's "top priority" must be to finalize the submarine deal with China.

    Though much emphasis by analysts has been on the state of Pakistan's frigate force Bateman believes the next priority should lie with fast attack craft.

    "In a conflict situation, these would be the major surface assets of the [Pakistan Navy]."

    Pakistan is currently building further examples of the Azmat class stealthy fast attack craft, but has is believed to be considering something more potent.

    News of Pakistan's interest in the Chinese Type-022 'Houbei' was first reported in June. Speaking at the time, Tom Waldwyn of the International Institute for Strategic Studies expressed surprise.

    "It would be surprising if Pakistan, or indeed any country, signed a deal to purchase new Type-022s as China stopped production of these vessels several years ago. So any purchase of Type-022s would almost certainly be secondhand vessels," he said.

    Adding, "These types of vessels are more suited to littoral environments where they can attack opposing ships at high speed and fire off a barrage of anti-ship missiles. If Pakistan were to acquire these ships that is likely to be how they would be employed."

    The state of the frigates has attracted most attention however.

    "The current frigate force is just adequate for the [Pakistan Navy's] peacetime requirements, notably sovereignty protection and participation in international coalition and peacekeeping missions, such as the counter-piracy task forces in the Gulf region", said Bateman.

    Ideally, he believes two to three further Perry class frigates would help matters "to build up its frigate force to about eight vessels, if the updated F-22P vessels can't be acquired quickly."

    However, entrenched hostility toward Pakistan in the US Congress essentially rules this out, and Cloughley believes Pakistan has no real alternatives.

    "China is the obvious supplier, as it is unlikely that the US Congress would approve transfer of any surplus vessels, and in any event the US and European countries are concentrating on India as regards provision of military material."

    As for the Type-21 class frigates they are essentially obsolete and Bateman says they "should be scrapped."

    Modernization of Pakistan's airpower however could help mitigate some of the Navy's shortcomings, especially with the JF-17 Thunder now entering service.

    "The JF-17 can carry anti-ship missiles, and it is probable that when the present aircraft of 8 Squadron at Masroor are retired, then they will be replaced by a maritime strike version of the JF-17", said Cloughley.

    The JF-17 already equips No. 2 Squadron also based at Masroor, and can carry a brace of C-802A/CSS-N-8 Saccade anti-ship missiles.
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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Wed Feb 10, 2016 4:20 pm

    Jinnah Naval Base – Navy expands strategic outreach to West Coast, Persian Gulf

    While China and Pakistan endeavour to develop Gwadar Port as a commercial hub for the entire region, Pakistan Navy is gearing up to new face challenges and threats which might come its way after the port become functional; the navy has fully operationalised its strategic Jinnah Naval Base near Gwadar Port at Ormara, Balochistan.

    India has increased its naval strength in recent years and aims at transforming itself into a ‘blue-water navy’ within the next 10 to 15 years. By 2022, the Indian Navy will have 50 warships including three aircraft carriers, five nuclear submarines, 22 conventional submarines and a number of long range maritime patrol aircraft.

    India acquired a nuclear submarine (Akula-II) from Russia in April, 2012. A second nuclear submarine of the same class will be inducted soon. Moreover, the sea trials of its indigenous nuclear submarines are also in progress. Pakistani defence establishment is looking at this induction of nuclear submarines in Indian fleet as a cause of great concern.

    With minimal budgetary allocations, Pakistan Navy is quietly relying on minimum deterrence to counter any external threat. Jinnah base may just be the answer to Pakistan’s prayers.

    The base is situated 350 km west of Karachi and 285 km east of the Gwadar Port, and has been connected with China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

    “With the development of this base, Pakistan has acquired the capacity to secure naval trade in these waters. Moreover, we have expanded Pakistan naval forces’ outreach towards the west coast into the Strait of Hormuz where all the oil traffic flows in and out,” an officer at the base told Pakistan Today during a recent visit to the base at Ormara which is otherwise restricted for media.

    “Karachi would remain our focus for the foreseeable future. However, Jinnah base would reduce reaction time of Pakistan Navy to six to 8 hours in case of any adversity,” the officer said, adding that the base had a berthing facility “for anything from warships to submarines and from heavy ships to warplanes”.

    Asked whether or not Gwadar would also act as a naval base for Pakistan, the officer said that Gwadar would act purely as a commercial base.

    “Though Pakistan Navy has a small base at Gwadar, its main focus would be security of Gwadar. Jinnah base, on the other hand, would be a purely naval base which would help maritime forces monitor the entire coastal area from Ormara to the Gulf waters,” the officer said.

    Rear Admiral (r) Pervez Asghar, an expert on naval defence, told Pakistan Today that Pakistan Navy had developed four bases along the coastal areas of Balochistan including Ormara, Pasni, Jewani and Gwadar which had helped expand its ‘strategic outreach’ towards the west coast.

    “In the past, we only had one [naval] base at Karachi and our military installations were vulnerable to any Indian adventure. However, with the development of these new bases towards the west coast, not only do we have alternative options to defend our positions, our reaction time has also decreased significantly in case of any attack,” the retired naval admiral said.

    He said that the navy now also had a submarine base at Ormara. “We have developed Pakistan marine corps to thwart enemy designs of amphibious landing around the coastal areas,” he added.

    “Pakistan Navy is now well placed to secure all sea lines of communications (SLOCs) emanating from the Persian gulf towards Pakistan. Moreover, the naval infrastructure including Radars and communication gadgets, have now been able to overlap each other – a capability we had severely missed in the past,” he added.

    He said that the new bases had also helped secure Gwadar Port as there was no military presence on the port due to its being commercial in nature.

    “Now, navy’s special forces are better placed in Ormara to secure Gwadar Port and nearby sea routes. Moreover, Ormara base would also help neutralise the enemy’s narrative that they would be able to block Karachi’s harbour in case of a showdown,” he added.

    Asghar said that Pakistan had also developed a jump-off base for Pakistan’s maritime aircraft at Pasni.

    He said that Pakistan Navy had recently raised another naval station at Turbat, namely PNS Siddiq for P-3c Orion aircraft.

    “These P-3cs are capable of flying over 14 hours nonstop without refueling. They have stealth technology and can fly below the radar and strike India’s Eastern coast. Pakistan Navy has also developed Naval Base Jewani, about 60 km from Iran to help expand its outreach into the Gulf waters,” he added.

    Jinnah base would act as an alternative option for Pakistan Navy to Karachi where all the logistic and technical support for berthing navy’s ships and even submarines were available.

    “We have developed the required facilities for technical repair of ships and submarines at the base. It is an alternative arrangement to the Karachi base and can easily meet our defence requirements. However, Karachi dockyard would still be the center for major overhaul or repair,” the Jinnah base officer said.

    The officer said that during the next five years, navy plans to develop huge workshops at Ormara, which would also have the ability to overhaul submarines and warships.

    He said that the Jinnah base’s positioning provided cover against natural calamities and enemy’s advances as it was covered by sea on two sides and a 2 km wide hill stood on the third.

    On the top of the hill, called `Hammer Mountain’ due to its shape, Navy’s surveillance unit RDS-Mianwali is stationed to help the officers keep an eye on movements taking place in and around the area.

    Since the Karachi coast has become a hub of commercial activity, making it difficult for the Navy to perform its tasks and the industrial waste in Karachi’s waters has been damaging the Navy’s assets and reducing the life of the ships, Ormara is a better option for future Naval operations.

    The law and order situation in the entire coastal belt is far better than other parts of the restive Balochistan province as well as Karachi where Rangers along with other paramilitary forces is involved in a clean-up operation.

    Jewani, with a population of around 100,000 people and approximately 90 km away from Gwadar Port City, serves as a main surveillance point for Pakistan Navy to keep an eye on all the maritime traffic in the Arabian Sea.

    Due to proximity of the area with Iran, many inhabitants of the area are duel nationals and can freely visit Iran on a mere permit from the deputy commissioner.

    But navy has also has reached out to the locals in the area to win hearts and minds of the Baloch people. It has set up educational and health facilities, many of which provide free of cost services to the local people. Under Chief of Naval Staff’s scheme ‘Adopt A Child’, navy officers are paying educational and other expenses of 100 children in the area. The navy also provides jobs to locals in their facilities.

    The navy operates a PN Hospital in Ormara which contains facilities like emergency department, trauma center, intensive care unit, labour room, operation theatre and a pharmacy.

    A Navy Cadet College has also been set up the area, where 50 per cent of the admissions are offered to candidates from within Balochistan under a district-quota system. The other 50 per cent seats are offered to candidates from other provinces of the country.

    A Bahria Model School is also working in the area to impart education to Baloch children. The school runs on donations and financial support of the provincial government.

    http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2016/01/14/national/jinnah-naval-base-navy-expands-strategic-outreach-to-west-coast-persian-gulf-2/


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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  max steel on Wed Apr 13, 2016 2:13 pm

    The Pakistan Navy Inducts A New Anti-Ship Missile – “Zarb”

    The Pakistan Navy has recently test-fired a shore-based anti-ship missile (AShM) named “Zarb.” Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR) did not offer any specific information, such as range, speed, or payload weight.

    Pakistan had issued a navigational warning notice several days in advance of the test. The maximum range allotted for the test was set at 300km, which was compliant with the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), an international legal framework that regulates commercial missile and drone sales on the global arms market.

    The Zarb was inducted to enhance Pakistan’s area denial capabilities by equipping its coastal areas with AShM-tipped launch batteries, which in turn could fire AShMs at intruding surface ships up to a maximum range of 300km.

    Upon concluding the test, the Navy announced that it had formally inducted the Zarb AShM. With no prior tests registered over the Arabian Sea, and the fact that it is MTCR-compliant, it is likely that the Zarb is an off-the-shelf purchase.

    That said, the specific characteristics of the Zarb AShM are unknown. Given the fact that it was tested from a coastal battery, it is plausible to suggest that the Zarb is basically the C-602.

    Produced by China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), the C-602 is a heavy AShM capable of delivering a 300kg warhead. A heavier variant (with a 480kg warhead) is also available in the form of the CM-602G.

    The idea of Pakistan acquiring the C-602 is not a surprise, but the use of a local name (i.e. Zarb) suggests that the missile is being produced domestically.

    Given the added cost of such a technology transfer (i.e. to produce the missile domestically), would it not make more sense for Pakistan to acquire the C-802 instead? At this time, the C-602 can only be used from Pakistan’s coasts, there are no surface warships or aircraft capable of carrying such a heavy munition.

    On the other hand, the C-802 is in use with the Pakistan Navy’s Zulfiqar-class (F-22P) frigates, Azmat-class fast attack crafts (FAC), and even the Pakistan Air Force’s (PAF) JF-17s. Moreover, there is nothing to stop the C-802 from being launched from land either.

    The comparatively widespread adoption of the C-802 within the Pakistan Armed Forces makes it a more suitable candidate for local production than the C-602. In any case, this is speculation on our part, it still has not been confirmed whether the Zarb is being locally produced (under license or otherwise).
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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Sun Aug 21, 2016 6:25 am

    August 19, 2016 on Pakistan Naval Dockyard Karachi Shipyard and Engineering Works (KSEW) in Karachi held a ceremony launching under construction for the Pakistan Navy squadron tanker.



    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2079147.html


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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Mon Nov 28, 2016 4:15 am

    In Pakistan, was put into operation a communication center with submarines

    http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2285078.html


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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Thu Jan 19, 2017 2:51 pm

    Pakistan Builds New Missile Boat to Protect Key Trade Routes

    http://www.defensenews.com/articles/pakistan-builds-new-missile-boat-to-protect-key-trade-routes


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    Re: Pakistan Navy: News

    Post  George1 on Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:39 am

    ISLAMABAD — Pakistan successfully test launched a land-based anti-ship missile on Thursday, but the did not reveal its identity, possibly indicating it is a new development of its Babur land-attack cruise missile.

    http://www.defensenews.com/articles/pakistan-conducts-anti-ship-missile-test


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